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  1. #1

    Zediva New Movie Rental Company (Works Worldwide)

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Zediva Inc, a startup, said it has launched a new service that lets customers watch movies over the Web the same day they are released on DVD, avoiding the usual delays required by film studios.
    At a cost of $1.99 a rental, Zediva is the latest company looking to shake up Hollywood's traditional business model, joining popular rental services such as Netflix Inc and Coinstar's. Netflix charges $7.99 a month for its streaming service.
    But Netflix and Redbox customers usually must wait a period of 28 days before they can rent newly released DVDs, under agreements that give the studios a chance to sell DVDs before they hit the rental market. Zediva plans to sidestep those delays.
    Its service allows a user choose from an online menu of movies, then remotely rent that DVD as well as a DVD player, both of which are stored at a Silicon Valley data center. Zediva then uses the DVD player to stream the movie over the Web, to a laptop, smartphone or TV.
    Customers have access to all the typical DVD controls -- fast forward, rewind, pause -- and are given up to 14 days to watch the movie.
    Whether Zediva will face legal challenges from Hollywood remains to be seen. Another question is whether the service will have a big enough supply of DVDs and players to meet demand -- particularly for the most popular movies.


    Note:2 free rentals on sign up per household

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Calgary, AB
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    1,044
    Are these guys joking? You can't just "sidestep" studio contracts .. lol .. and they can't just setup online and stream internationally either .. otherwise Netflix and Hulu would be already doing that.

    Heck Walmart owns and operates Vudu.com which offers streaming rentals in SD, HD and HDX and even they have delayed releases happening, you can buy the movie before you can rent it, same with iTunes. So if freaking Walmart and Apple can't get around the studio contracts these idiots won't be able to either.

    Expect them to be shut down real quick, I wouldn't be trusting my credit card info with such an outfit that's for sure.

  3. #3
    they have been around for 6 months now and have never been shut down they are out of beta now

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Calgary, AB
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    Ok, dug a bit deeper into this setup.

    Well they're a bit shady, their whois is a private listing so they're hiding themselves. But they are exploiting a loophole it seems, that is the US First Sale doctrine in US copyright law which allows rental of purchased DVDs and they are indeed apparently renting you a DVD Player and disc which are then streamed to you online.

    http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2011/03/zediva/

    http://techcrunch.com/2010/11/24/zediva/

    So, this can go only a couple of ways .. A) the studios do nothing about it and Netflix, iTunes and Vudu scream bloody murder since they are obligated to hold back on rentals for many new releases and are largely restricted to territories while Zediva is selling worldwide … or B) Zediva will be in court with the studios really really fast.

    My bet is the latter :)

    One thing to note with their current setup, delivered by Flash and no DD5.1, etc.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    4,766
    This will probably take the Napster road... well, not exactly.

    First, Hollywood will send cease & desist letters, expecting a huge payment. But on the other hand, 2$ per rental is much more attracting than 8$ per month. They could potentially settle with shares in Zediva (just like Napster) and relaunch the website with their rules and 100% payout, but the problem is that the name Zediva ain't popular enough. Hollywood will prefer to target a name on everyone's lips, which is Netflix. Take an already popular name, take it over, cash in. That's what they want.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    116
    The bottom line is that Netflix is established and has new contracts with the studios and has worked around the bandwidth cap. They will continue to grow and are only 7.99 a month . Allowing you to watch unlimited movies and tv series and shows on your ipod touch ,ps3 ,wii, xbox ,computer and tv can only be described as very appealing to the new generation. These other groups are well behind and will have a lot of trouble establishing a large customer base.
    InMontreal may even switch to Netflix one of these days if he doesnt already secretly have it!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Montreal
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    An update on the subject was forgotten back in April 4th...

    As Expected, MPAA Sues Movie Streaming Site That Uses Connected DVD Players
    from the who-didn't-see-that-coming dept

    When Zediva launched, we already knew it was going to face a legal fight from the MPAA and the movie studios. The company lets people stream movies they want to see, but tries to get around the legal licensing issues by only streaming directly from internet connected DVD players, playing legitimately acquired DVDs. Their argument is that it's really no different than renting a movie and bringing it to your own DVD player. And, perhaps, the Cablevision ruling in the US on remote DVRs gives them some support for their position. But, there was no way the industry was going to just let this go by without any sort of fight. And, so, the MPAA has now sued the company claiming that it's a "sham," and that Zediva is running an illegal video-on-demand service without the proper licenses. In some ways, this case could also impact the attempts by cloud music players to stream legitimate content without a license as well.

    All of these situations -- the remote DVR, the remote DVD and cloud music players -- all involve the entertainment industry demanding extra payments for how you use legitimately purchased content. It's really quite amazing what a stunning sense of entitlement the entertainment industry has here. Even if you've legitimately purchased their content, they want to limit what you can actually do with it unless you pay another licensing fee. It's really quite ridiculous and shows the level of desperation these firms are reaching.
    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/201...-players.shtml
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    116

    zedvia will close

    A company like Zedvia will go the way of other sites like Napster . Its doing something technically illegal and I think they will be shut down in the next few months. Its too good to be true for sure. The concept sounds great but the unanswered questions and liability issues are too much to be ignored. Ill stick with Netflix a proven winner and a great service.

 

 

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