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  1. #1
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    News articles about cord cutting and OTA installation

    The Switch, Part 1
    Goodbye cable bills, now I get my TV for free
    MICHAEL SNIDER
    Globe and Mail Update
    Published Thursday, Jun. 09, 2011 12:00AM EDT

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...37/singlepage/
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  2. #2
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    Sep 2006
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    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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    I'd be interested in cord cutting if my TV Subscription wasn't hidden in my Condo Fees.

  3. #3
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    The Wire Report Canada's July edition have a 10 pages PDF about the transition.

    http://www.thewirereport.ca/reports/...uly%202011.pdf
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  4. #4
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    Another one from the Vancouver Sun:

    Digital era may herald return of rabbit ears

    Free TV is becoming a viable option as Canada bids farewell to analog broadcasts
    http://www.vancouversun.com/entertai...779/story.html
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  5. #5
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    News report en français on RDI by SRC Winnipeg. This ain't journalism, no research was done.

    Basically at the beginning of the report, they say that analog OTA is out because the CRTC needs to clear the airwaves to be used by emergency and mobile services. Home residents have to say goodbye to analog OTA and say hi to cable and satellite. On August 31st, the outdoor antenna will receive nothing at all, except lightning discharges.

    Video is in french only.
    http://www.radio-canada.ca/audio-vid...08190800_1.asx
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  6. #6
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    Hate cable, want to quit? Deloitte says you’re all talk
    STEVE LADURANTAYE
    The Globe and Mail
    Published Tuesday, Jan. 15 2013, 3:02 PM EST

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/techn...rticle7364600/

    =======

    Interesting, but near the end, the bad journalist makes you reflet a bad reality where cable company is the only option for Internet, so if you cut cable TV, your only option is streaming, and bust your low monthly cap.

    There was no mention of indoor/outdoor antenna, and no mention of wholesale internet service providers with way better monthly caps.

    God, I hate those amateur journalists.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  7. #7
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    Apr 2012
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    Articles like this are often "planted" so that consumers become less willing to try something new and "scary."

    That article deals with the "legal" alternatives and frankly dares the reader to cut the cord and survive with only those legal services that are currently available in Canada.

    Canada sucks, so how can you keep up with all the great stuff if you were to avoid the one-click file locker downloads, and also not use a VPN or DNS service (or browser addon)?

    I never bothered with VPNs, Internet boxes (Boxee, etc.), Netflix, or a bunch of other things that Internet lovers depend on. Instead, I just stick to one-click downloads or streams, Hulu (with browser addon) and my local libraries. That's more than enough to keep me up to date, but I also mix in some OTA viewing for a few things that are harder to find online.

    In an HMV Canada article in today's Toronto Star, it mentions that DVD sales are still strong enough because it takes too long to download a movie. Well, I beg to differ. Waiting twenty minutes for an SD movie and 40 minutes for an HD one to finish downloading is not that bad. It's even faster if I go to the library and download multiple files at once, at higher speeds. It can take as little as 10 minutes to download 4 or 5 SD movies, if you use the right links. And if you're not sure what to download, you can always stream a few minutes (from the beginning, middle and end) of the movies to see if it's worth the time it takes to download them.

    Cost is less of an issue for me because even if the Internet cost me $70 month, I'd still be getting much more bang for my buck than I could ever get with Cable TV at that price. I still love the idea of Cable TV, but if you combine it with the Internet, you'll probably soon realize that there's simply not enough time in the day to watch all the great stuff. That's why cutting the cord makes sense for me ... I'm simply choosing the best service at the best price, but I STILL don't have enough time to watch all that I download.

    Can I get everything I want to see from the Internet for free? No, but I also can't get everything I want to see from Cable TV, even if I had unlimited funds.
    Last edited by PokerFace; 01-16-2013 at 11:56 PM. Reason: then/than, potato/potatto
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  8. #8
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    For the most part, I would agree with the assessment made in the article. When Bell cancelled my TV service a year and a half ago, after I refused to also subscribe to their internet service Bell mandates you get with their FibeTV, I only went for ten days with antenna only before getting Rogers cable. I still use the antenna for the unsimsubbed U.S. network shows, but there's a lot of shows, mostly sports, that I want to see that aren't OTA. And I think many people, like my mother, who could likely get all or most of their programming OTA and/or online, just aren't technically inclined enough to make the effort. I knew I was going to get cable or internet, but not both. I still don't get internet service at home, and if and when I do it will not be from Bell or Rogers. I heard someone saying they've been getting free Wi-Fi for a couple of months after they moved into an apartment across the road from a restaurant franchise. Would they let that go on indefinitely, or do they eventually check and block someone they know is using it every day from outside without buying their food or coffee?
    Last edited by Donovan's Monkey; 01-17-2013 at 08:43 AM.

  9. #9
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    How would they know who's not buying coffee, especially if the store is open 24 hours? I see people using the free WiFi while sitting on a mall bench on an entirely different floor, but still close enough to get the WiFi signal ... no purchase necessary. I'm jealous.
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    How would they know who's not buying coffee, especially if the store is open 24 hours? I see people using the free WiFi while sitting on a mall bench on an entirely different floor, but still close enough to get the WiFi signal ... no purchase necessary. I'm jealous.
    They could easily password protect the wifi and change the key on a regular basis. The current key could be printed automatically on customer receipts which would force people to first make a purchase.

  11. #11
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    May 2012
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    I don't have the internet at home and don't plan to get it. I decided that I will disconnect my cable once the bill reaches $50. I currently go to the library and catch up on the shows that I miss. There is only so many shows you may watch at the library, therefore I will have to slowly break myself of the habit of watching TV and find something more productive to do, if the cost of cable does not go down.

  12. #12
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    Nothing wrong with breaking the TV habit.

    If you can also live without having high-speed Internet at your home, that's even more of an achievement.
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avonregal View Post
    There is only so many shows you may watch at the library, therefore I will have to slowly break myself of the habit of watching TV and find something more productive to do, if the cost of cable does not go down.
    What library has the speed to watch streaming videos? Toronto Public Library WiFi speeds are as slow as dial-up.

    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    If you can also live without having high-speed Internet at your home, that's even more of an achievement.
    Kind of harder these days, seeing that most personal entrainment requires an Internet connection of some sort.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    What library has the speed to watch streaming videos? Toronto Public Library WiFi speeds are as slow as dial-up.
    I finally got home internet service a few months ago after previously only having dial-up at home. But before that, I would also go to Toronto Public Libraries, and usually had little trouble, although it could be slow on some days. I think bringing your own laptop and using their WiFi was better than using one of the library's terminals from what I can recall, although of course using them also meant you could get cut off after 30 or 60 minutes. It was certainly much better than the dial-up I still had at home at that time, which was of no use at all for any video, and was becoming increasingly useless in general as fewer sites remained that could be adequately viewed on dial-up.

  15. #15
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    The library computers are fast, but since TPL changed to Windows 7, there are too many limitations for streaming and downloading because many of the sites and links that work at home (and previously worked with Windows XP at TPL), no longer work at the library (they don't update the various components that are often required), and because I can't use adblock or browser extensions, the streaming on the library computers is less enjoyable.

    I've never used wifi before, but even with the slower wifi speeds, it certainly would be less frustrating to get content that way, rather than using the library computers. Unfortunately, since I'm now used to having the Internet at my home, I don't think I'd bother with free wifi ... unless I only needed to get a few things, or was rarely home.
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  16. #16
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    May 2012
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    Some branches of the Toronto Public Library allows you to borrow a laptop. I am not sure if it is only for use in the library or you can take it home. I am sure that it is for more than one hour. If that is the case, I could borrow the laptop and download the programs, unless I would stilll encounter the problem PokerFace mention in his comment?

  17. #17
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    May 2012
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    Someone told me that software makers are forcing people to get the internet by making the products they make only run with internet connection. Prior to upgrading my computer software, I was able to listen to music that I copied from my CD and now Windows XP Media Player will only work with internet connection so I can't listen to the music I copied.

  18. #18
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    I haven't tried my windows media player for quite a while, so I don't know about any changes made to the program.

    According to the TPL website, the laptops (only 37 of them with a 2-hour limit, then 2-hour renewal possibility) borrowed from the library can't be taken home, nor can you save files on the laptop itself (even though the library computers let you download files to the hard drive, you still can't run any downloaded programs like browser extensions, unless there's a way to go around that?), so you'll need to attach a USB to the laptop.

    I assume that the library laptops might be updated more frequently than the main library computers, but if they are not, they still might not work with many of the websites or links that I use at home. It's certainly worth a try if you're lucky enough to get one.

    http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/u...rrow-a-laptop/
    [TPL laptops]
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donovan's Monkey View Post
    I finally got home internet service a few months ago after previously only having dial-up at home. But before that, I would also go to Toronto Public Libraries, and usually had little trouble, although it could be slow on some days. I think bringing your own laptop and using their WiFi was better than using one of the library's terminals from what I can recall, although of course using them also meant you could get cut off after 30 or 60 minutes. It was certainly much better than the dial-up I still had at home at that time, which was of no use at all for any video, and was becoming increasingly useless in general as fewer sites remained that could be adequately viewed on dial-up.
    I brought my own laptop, and the WiFI Internet speeds where just as bad, I assumed they throddled them because people would stream videos.

    Quote Originally Posted by Avonregal View Post
    Someone told me that software makers are forcing people to get the internet by making the products they make only run with internet connection. Prior to upgrading my computer software, I was able to listen to music that I copied from my CD and now Windows XP Media Player will only work with internet connection so I can't listen to the music I copied.
    Cloud Computing is what they call using software that requires an active internet connection now, and they have their pros and cons, but your problem your experiencing with Media Player is Microsoft scaning your media files to confirm you have proper licences for your music. I would sugges to download VLC that can rip, play and stream any audio and video file out there and dump Media Player ASAP.

    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    I haven't tried my windows media player for quite a while, so I don't know about any changes made to the program.
    Windows Media Player is like the Ark of the Covenant, don't look directly at it, and you won't melt like wax. :cool2:

    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    According to the TPL website, the laptops (only 37 of them with a 2-hour limit, then 2-hour renewal possibility) borrowed from the library can't be taken home, nor can you save files on the laptop itself (even though the library computers let you download files to the hard drive, you still can't run any downloaded programs like browser extensions, unless there's a way to go around that?), so you'll need to attach a USB to the laptop.

    I assume that the library laptops might be updated more frequently than the main library computers, but if they are not, they still might not work with many of the websites or links that I use at home. It's certainly worth a try if you're lucky enough to get one.
    You can still run portable apps like Firefox, Chrome and Open/Libre Office off an USB Memory stick with all your settings and extensions intact, I would just recommended scanning your memory stick every time you bring it back to your home computer, you don't know where those laptops have been.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

 

 

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