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Thread: Cord Cutters

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  1. #1
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    Cord Cutters

    I have noticed online how popular cord cutting has become in both Canada and the USA . I personally cut the cord recently and use OTA antenna for locals in true HD . Your picture is compressed through cable boxes and not true HD . Also use Apple Tv and stream Netflix , NHL and WSJ Live as well as YOUTUBE all on my big screen plasma . I aslo used Majicjack Plus and got rid of my landline for 29.95 yr. :) You can save a lot of money by using alternative methods to get your entertainment online.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelnikel View Post
    I personally cut the cord recently and use OTA antenna for locals in true HD . Your picture is compressed through cable boxes and not true HD . .
    Not all cable providers do this, Shaw has made upgrades that don't compress HD signals.

    Source:

    http://www.globalnews.ca/major+netwo...293/story.html


    Customers of Shaw Communications are about to notice a big boost in service. The Shaw network is undergoing major upgrades and that’s made the launch of Shaw EXO possible.

    With EXO, subscribers will have access to improved HD television signals, a greater selection of on-demand titles in full 1080p high-definition, and internet speeds of up to 250 megabits per second.

    Shaw Cable subscribers will be the first to notice the changes: access to more than 1,200 HD on-demand movies as well as the top 20 shows on Global Television and other Canadian networks 24 hours after they air.

    Some content will also be available for streaming online, on-demand.

    Existing customers won’t have to do anything to get the improved service, as long as they are already receiving HD broadcasts by cable. Customers of Shaw Direct satellite will see the upgrades in about a year when a new satellite is launched capable of delivering the services.

    But TV is just the beginning. As EXO is an upgrade to Shaw’s entire network, new and existing customers will soon enjoy much faster internet connection speeds and the ability to get WiFi service across wider areas.

    “SHAW EXO is a promise that we will continue to innovate, lead and provide the latest in technology and entertainment offerings to customers,” said Peter Bissonnette, President, Shaw Communications Inc. “With Shaw EXO, the power of our network allows us to continue delivering the products and services that our customers are looking for.”

    The company notes that TV programs are also delivered at a higher bit rate, which means Shaw's signal is not compressed like it is with other cable providers. That translates into better picture quality for viewers.

    TV viewers will need to have a 1080p (full HD) capable television and connect via an HDMI cable in order to receive the full benefit of the improved signal. An HD-ready television is not enough.

    Shaw EXO On Demand is a new interface that provides access to the entire on-demand library for all Shaw EXO TV customers to stream select content online or on their televisions.

    Customers who have Shaw Gateway already have access to the full on-demand library on their televisions through the Gateway hardware. However, those who have HD or digital hardware, will be able to access the library online.

    Existing Shaw internet customers in select markets in western Canada will have access – at no extra charge – to Shaw EXO WiFi, that will allow them to connect to the internet in public locations such as malls, parks and public transportation areas. Shaw is planning to expand this limited trial to hundreds of new Shaw EXO WiFi locations over the next several months.

    The company plans to eventually expand WiFi service across the country.


    Read it on Global News: Global News | Major network upgrades boost service as Shaw EXO launches
    Last edited by TVViewer; 03-14-2012 at 02:07 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Not all cable providers do this, Shaw has made upgrades that don't compress HD signals.

    Source:

    The company notes that TV programs are also delivered at a higher bit rate, which means Shaw's signal is not compressed like it is with other cable providers. That translates into better picture quality for viewers.

    http://www.globalnews.ca/major+netwo...293/story.html
    I'd be interested in knowing what this actually means. TVViewer's interpretation is technically wrong because their signals, like virtually all digital signals (including OTA), are compressed (usually MPEG-2 or 4).

    Rogers used to pass through broadcasters signals without recompressing them, but I don't think they do that anymore. Is that what Shaw means by "not compressed like it is with other cable providers"?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    I'd be interested in knowing what this actually means. TVViewer's interpretation is technically wrong because their signals, like virtually all digital signals (including OTA), are compressed (usually MPEG-2 or 4).
    ATSC (OTA): The HD signals are compressed to MPEG-2. One or multiple feeds share up to 19.4 Mbit/s of data, encapsulated to 8VSB and sent to the transmitting antenna.
    Infos: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATSC_standards

    Cable: A local HD signal can either come from the OTA signal or a fiber provided by the broadcaster. Rogers, Shaw, Vidéotron and Cogeco also use MPEG-2, add one or two other HD feeds which share up to 38.8 Mbit/s, encapsulate to QAM-256 and sent to the distribution network.

    In the case of Vidéotron, they have setup antennas down in LaColle, near the Canada/US border, which captures the OTA signals from Burlington (ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, and the two PBS), then takes the main signal as is (flushes the secondary feed), pair it with another US station and feeds it to QAM-256 to their customers. So when comparing bitrates, it's exactly the same.

    Locally, either they receive an uncompressed version (50 Mbit/s in 1080p) and they perform compression themselves, or either the broadcaster sends them an already compressed version. The cable provider can then choose to use the full 19.4 Mbps for a station, or fit 3 HD channels into one QAM, compressing each station to a maximum of 12.9 Mbit/s. I know Rogers compresses all specialties to 3 HD channels per QAM to save bandwidth. I dunno about local stations.

    Bhell satellite modifies every feed to 720p at a low bitrate to spare bandwidth but smooths the image so you won't notice compression artifacts.

    Bhell Fibe changes all MPEG-2 feeds to MPEG-4 compression, but they now compresses more so they can fit 3 HD feeds + 1 SD feed + 7 Mbps of internet data into one 25 Mbps line.

    Conclusion: not all service providers compress the hell out of all OTA stations. If/when Canadian OTA stations will start providing digital sub-channels, maybe the best bitrate will be found on cable... unless the cable provider compresses the hell out of it already?
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelnikel View Post
    I can get most of their content free and with Netflix and OTA locals
    Until Bell becomes powerful enough to buy three quarters of the CRTC board and has Netflix ejected out of the country under the disguise of "repatriating" Canadian viewers.


    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    ATSC (OTA): The HD signals are compressed to MPEG-2. One or multiple feeds share up to 19.4 Mbit/s of data, encapsulated to 8VSB and sent to the transmitting antenna.
    Infos: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATSC_standards

    Cable: A local HD signal can either come from the OTA signal or a fiber provided by the broadcaster. Rogers, Shaw, Vidéotron and Cogeco also use MPEG-2, add one or two other HD feeds which share up to 38.8 Mbit/s, encapsulate to QAM-256 and sent to the distribution network.
    Most cable providers haven't starting using QAM-256 for cable transmissions; Rogers for example only uses it to transmit radio and music channels as well as on screen-graphics for its VOD services. Most cable providers are in long term contracts with equipment providers such as Cisco to use their encoding/decoding systems.

    Fun fact: Digital OTA transmits at ~37 Mbit/s but only leaves room for 19 Mbit/s for video,audio and PSIP, the rest is for error correction.

    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    In the case of Vidéotron, they have setup antennas down in LaColle, near the Canada/US border, which captures the OTA signals from Burlington (ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, and the two PBS), then takes the main signal as is (flushes the secondary feed), pair it with another US station and feeds it to QAM-256 to their customers. So when comparing bitrates, it's exactly the same.
    Cable and Satellite providers don't use OTA in the same manner to connect to stations as the end user who uses bunny ears to pick of channels via OTA. Most Cable ans Satellite providers pick up their channels via C-Band (aka The Big Ugly Dish) or fiber in metropolitan areas.


    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    Bell Fibe changes all MPEG-2 feeds to MPEG-4 compression, but they now compresses more so they can fit 3 HD feeds + 1 SD feed + 7 Mbps of internet data into one 25 Mbps line.
    This may explain why some people complain about the video quality being poor, when you up convert or down convert a lossy compressed file your prone to data loss, resulting in a poorer image.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    Most cable providers haven't starting using QAM-256 for cable transmissions;
    Huh? Vidéotron uses QAM-256 since their implementation in 1999. What does Rogers use then?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    Cable and Satellite providers don't use OTA in the same manner to connect to stations as the end user who uses bunny ears to pick of channels via OTA. Most Cable ans Satellite providers pick up their channels via C-Band (aka The Big Ugly Dish) or fiber in metropolitan areas.
    I guess Rogers picks Buffalo station by fiber due to their proximity from the border, Shaw may also pick Detroit stations by fiber.

    But Bhell may take Boston US channels via satellite, Shaw take Seattle US channels via satellite, and I know for a fact that Burlington stations are picked OTA as we customers experienced reception problems whenever there was a transmission problem at the Mount Mansfield.

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    Don't they use the Plattsburgh stations anymore?
    Burlington (Vermont) and Plattsburgh (NY state) is the same market. Just a river to cross. Actually, Fox-44, ABC-22, CBS-3 and PBS-33 are based in Burlington while NBC-5 and PBS-57 are based in Plattsburgh.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    Until Bell becomes powerful enough to buy three quarters of the CRTC board and has Netflix ejected out of the country under the disguise of "repatriating" Canadian viewers.
    That's going to be tough. Netflix is a foreign company that has made deals with other foreign companies (Paramount). They may be able to take back the .ca domain name since that's controlled by the CIRA but aside from that they seem to operating outside the authority of Canadian law.

    Besides if they made Netflix illegal I'm sure that'd garner displeasure from US media companies being told they can't deal with who they choose to sell their content too as well as media coverage when US news channels head over to Windsor to interview the local Wal-Mart manger as he pulls Blu-Ray players from the shelves because they've been made "illegal" in Canada.
    Last edited by NakedGord; 03-19-2012 at 09:26 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    In the case of Vidéotron, they have setup antennas down in LaColle, near the Canada/US border, which captures the OTA signals from Burlington (ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, and the two PBS)
    Don't they use the Plattsburgh stations anymore?

  9. #9
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    Thats what they are telling you!

    The cable companies will say and tell you anything right now to keep customers . They are losing customers daily due to their high prices and lack of customer choices . Don't be fooled by any of their press releases . OTA is definitely a better picture than they can ever offer and its free ! When I went to leave Rogers they offered me 50% off my cable and I declined . They will no longer control what I watch and when I watch it . I can get most of their content free and with Netflix and OTA locals I don't need them anymore. They also bumped up my internet service speed and bandwidth and gave 30% off or I was switching providers. So bargain and use your heads when dealing with multi-million dollar corporations .


    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Not all cable providers do this, Shaw has made upgrades that don't compress HD signals.

    Source:

    http://www.globalnews.ca/major+netwo...293/story.html
    Last edited by steelnikel; 03-18-2012 at 06:30 AM.

  10. #10
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    you can get free vpn to access us content

    It is easy to run a free vpn on your laptop or netbook and stream hulu,Netflix usa etc.... No need to pay for vpn service when there are many free ones out there that are great.:D

  11. #11
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    Watching American content without a VPN, or similar service.

    I recently noticed that I can stream many of the American TV shows (like The Big C) BEFORE they air in Canada, without needing to use a VPN or similar service. I don't have high-speed Internet service (or even a laptop), so I use my local Public Library for streaming (I don't know how to use a free VPN with the Library computer, or if it's even possible -- perhaps by using a thumbdrive for the download?).

    Anyway, now that I can stream American TV shows like The Client List (merely to see what outfits Jennifer Love Hewitt is squeezing into) for free (often before they even air in Canada), I'm not worried about cutting my Rogers Cable cord (at the end of July), or even watching fewer OTA broadcasts because I'm spending more of my time at the Library, streaming American content.

    As long as many of the American websites (Lifetime, USA, TNT, etc.) continue to be geo-blocked, I'll continue to stream some of the programming from unprotected links. If it's not illegal to stream geo-blocked American content using a VPN or similar service, I doubt it's illegal to watch the exact same content using simple Google searches and alternate geo-free links.
    Last edited by PokerFace; 05-19-2012 at 04:35 PM. Reason: typo

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    The Perfect Storm has arrived in the form of the Internet and my Blu-ray player

    With less than a week to go before my Rogers Cable contract ends, I've been spending more time at various Public Libraries downloading and streaming content that is quite often not available through Rogers.

    Throw in all the Canadian websites that offer quite a bit of exclusive content for free, and it appears that a "Perfect Storm" is brewing. Now that I also purchased my very first Blu-ray player (still no HDTV, however), I can use its USB port to watch all the free content that I downloaded from the Library.

    Although I can live happily without Rogers, I assume that my next step will be to buy my very first laptop and use the free WIFI service that's offered at various WIFI hot spots (even closer to me than my local Library) to make things even more convenient for me (I still only have Dial-up Internet service for under $10/month).

    I'm very slow to embrace new technology, but as the price of Cable and Internet services continue to rise (and more and more US programming is delayed, or not carried by our Canadian channels), I'm less reluctant to expand my horizons and explore new ways to experience the entertainment world.

    In 2010, I correctly predicted that I would buy my first Blu-ray player in 2012, but I never imagined that I would be using it primarily for its USB port to view my Library downloads (plus free Blu-rays from the Libraries also keep me busy).

    However, I'm quite surprised that The Toronto Public Library system only carries a few Blu-rays (apparently all donated) and has yet to purchase any new Blu-ray discs (that I'm aware of). Other Public Library systems throughout Canada (yes, even Hamilton) carry hundreds/thousands of Blu-rays, but Toronto seems to be dragging its feet in the Blu-ray arena (I guess Toronto isn't the centre of the Universe, after all). ;)

    I assume that it will be many years before I upgrade to broadband Internet service (2014 at the earliest, but 2017 is more likely), so I have no need for Netflix or any other paid service that relies on broadband. I assume that my first HDTV will be Netflix-ready, but since I also predict that 2014-2017 is the purchase date for my new HDTV, I'll stick with free broadband service for now.

    Even though Americans seem to have an unfair advantage in gaining free access to much of the US programming that I sometimes struggle to find, I'm still able to find the majority of what I'm looking for using the Library computers, and have little time left over to worry about the content that is either too difficult to find, or might have to actually pay for (since I currently don't use Torrent sites that most freeloaders ... I mean downloaders, take advantage of).

    2012 has been a very good year for me, as far as entertainment goes ... I have been able to steer myself away from most online DVD purchases and instead stream or download content for free from the Internet (or else use the Public Library system for DVDs, Blu-rays and some CDs).

    Thanks to the Internet, the expensive and often frustrating experience of relying on Canadian television providers for my entertainment is about to come to an end. I certainly enjoyed myself over the past year with Rogers Cable TV, even with all the frustration of 4x3 SD Cable feeds that should have been shown in 16:9 (like most Bell-owned channels now offer ... and just like my OTA antenna still provides), but if I have to choose between free broadband Internet service and expensive Cable TV, I'm going to choose the Internet every time (even if I had to pay more for it than Cable TV).

    ---------------------

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe...rticle4424327/
    [The picture grows dimmer for cable investors]

    Tuesday, July 17 2012

    Cable stocks bask in the popular perception that they are stable generators of cash flow and dividends. But are they really that safe in a world full of young pirates?

    My brother is 30 years old. He doesn’t own a TV. He therefore doesn’t have cable. But he watches a lot of TV, which, like millions of other people, he downloads from the Internet. He doesn’t pay for these shows, to my knowledge, but even if he did – buying them from Netflix or iTunes – he still wouldn’t need cable.

    The loss of cable subscribers is called cord-cutting. I brought it up in this space as a potential threat to cable companies about two years ago. The tendency appears to be gathering steam – and it turns out cable companies are also burdened by other irksome problems, particularly the rise of Internet television services from phone companies. Investors should tread carefully.

    Shaw continues to lose basic cable subscribers, more than 20,000 in the latest quarter compared to about 14,000 in the same period a year before. For the first nine months of the fiscal year the company lost more than 50,000 basic cable subscribers, again higher than last year. This was offset by more digital subscribers but the rate of increase in that area has slowed to a crawl – only 246 new digital subscribers in the latest quarter. Internet customers fell, and phone customer growth is slowing down.

    Shaw has been able to mitigate deteriorating fundamentals by playing with its prices – raising them and then discounting. But it has not been able to fix the underlying problem. If it offers discounts, it slows the loss of subscribers but cash flow falls. If it doesn’t offer discounts, its cash flow is more robust but the trickle of customers toward the exit resumes.

    Where are these subscribers going? Some are presumably dropping cable all together. They download, legitimately or otherwise. They go back to rabbit ears, which carry digital signals now. Some defect to Shaw’s phone-company rival, Telus Corp., which, given its subscriber growth, appears to have a compelling Internet TV offering.

    Based on the anecdotes I hear, many younger people never get cable in the first place. They often don’t even buy TVs because their computers will do just fine for watching movies or shows.

    In the meantime, Shaw’s stock price has held up reasonably well despite the ravages of competition and technological change. The dividend helps. So does the belief held by some investors that Rogers Communications Inc. will eventually come along and buy Shaw.

    Remember, though, that Shaw’s payout is not guaranteed. And Rogers has the same cable issues as Shaw.

    Bottom line: Investors should ponder the clouds gathering over the cable industry. It’s easy to be complacent given the history of these companies, but complacency can be deadly.
    Last edited by PokerFace; 07-19-2012 at 08:57 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    Throw in all the Canadian websites that offer quite a bit of exclusive content for free, and it appears that a "Perfect Storm" is brewing. Now that I also purchased my very first Blu-ray player (still no HDTV, however), I can use its USB port to watch all the free content that I downloaded from the Library.


    I grew tired of Rogers VOD services since they disabled fast forward and in some cases, the pause function, but I wouldn't give up my high speed Internet, Rogers, Bell or wholesale. Too much part of my life (and work).

    As for the "Perfect Storm", Its no where near perfect, Bell's and Telus IPTV services is what is starting to eat away at cable. Even thought most are going back to the "bunny ears", but to make it a true perfect storm should show the same loss across all BDU providers; IPTV, cable and satellite.


    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    Although I can live happily without Rogers, I assume that my next step will be to buy my very first laptop and use the free WIFI service that's offered at various WIFI hot spots (even closer to me than my local Library) to make things even more convenient for me (I still only have Dial-up Internet service for under $10/month).
    Most WIFI hotspots like Toronto Public Library (TPL) or Starbucks will throttle your connection to a extremely slow speed if you surf large amounts of data, so do expect the greatest speed in the world. If you want a good high-speed provider, I would recommend a wholesale for home, but if your someone who is on the move a lot then I recommend you research into Wind Mobile or Public Mobile Mobile WIFI or Mobile Phone with a data plan and tethering support. Although make sure your in their coverage area.


    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    I'm very slow to embrace new technology, but as the price of Cable and Internet services continue to rise (and more and more US programming is delayed, or not carried by our Canadian channels), I'm less reluctant to expand my horizons and explore new ways to experience the entertainment world.
    Cable and then Satellite gave us more access to programming choices back in the day, but with nothing but repeats of old movies, reruns after reruns mixed with a few new shows, and with services like Netflix, and torrent for the more advance users, makes BDUs existent redundant.



    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    In 2010, I correctly predicted that I would buy my first Blu-ray player in 2012, but I never imagined that I would be using it primarily for its USB port to view my Library downloads (plus free Blu-rays from the Libraries also keep me busy).
    Your're ahead of me, I don't own a Blu-ray player, but I use my phone, with bulit-in HDMI port, to view my Library content in HD on my TV.


    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    However, I'm quite surprised that The Toronto Public Library system only carries a few Blu-rays (apparently all donated) and has yet to purchase any new Blu-ray discs (that I'm aware of). Other Public Library systems throughout Canada (yes, even Hamilton) carry hundreds/thousands of Blu-rays, but Toronto seems to be dragging its feet in the Blu-ray arena (I guess Toronto isn't the centre of the Universe, after all). ;)
    I think there is more, its just spread through the system. Hamilton and the towns and cities around Toronto will always have a bigger content because they have smaller library locations.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelnikel View Post
    I aslo used Majicjack Plus and got rid of my landline for 29.95 yr. :) You can save a lot of money by using alternative methods to get your entertainment online.
    In addition to MagicJack there's also free voip services like FreePhoneLine.ca and Dell Voice (yes...that Dell).

    In addition another tip to cut the cord is that TV on DVD for premium programming can be much cheaper in R2 from Amazon.co.uk. Not always but sometimes stuff is a fraction of the price and it's pretty easy to get a multi-region machine or make a machine multi-region with most value priced brands and even Philips.
    Last edited by NakedGord; 03-19-2012 at 09:28 AM.

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    You're welcome. I'm still paying Rogers each month, but just for cable. The only Internet I pay for is $2.95 ($3.33 with tax) for dial-up from someone else. I'm hoping the condominium that has been under construction for several years two doors away from me will finally be finished soon and have a restaurant franchise on street level that will hopefully have free wifi strong enough for me to use. Then I may not be paying anyone.

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    Yup, I also paid for the $2.95 dial-up service and Rogers cable for quite a while, but also used the library for free broadband Internet service.

    It was good enough for me back then, but now I'm spoiled rotten.

    When my Bell line went down for a few days, I had to slum it at the library. There were some annoying limitations, but I still managed to overcome most of the library computer obstacles getting in my way of raping the Internet.

    Inmate: Hey, dude. How come you're in jail?

    Me: I raped the Internet.

    Inmate: Good for you. Now let me return the favour.

    Me: No thanks. I'm already spoken for.

    Inmate: Your loss.

    Me: Winning isn't everything.

    Inmate: Yeah, it's the only thing.
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

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    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...ticle14998079/
    [Netflix CEO Reed Hastings downplays cord cutting]

    Excerpts from the above article link:

    The Globe & Mail
    Oct 22, 2013

    Mr. Hastings isn’t telling the whole story when he says the number of American subscribers has held steady at 100 million despite the introduction of alternative services. That number has indeed remained static since 2009, but prior to that, the market was adding almost two million subscribers a year. In other words, you can’t call someone a cord cutter if they never had a traditional television package in the first place.

    “Netflix is a contributor to U.S. cord cutting (and Canadian for that matter) so Hastings always downplays it,” Brahm Eiley of Convergence Consulting Group said.

    Netflix is also said to be looking to partner with cable companies, possibly by having a Netflix app built into the digital television boxes that bring signals into millions of homes. His defence of the industry could be seen as a conciliatory offering intended to clear the way for his next round of expansion.

    "He knows very well that when Netflix speaks, people in this business around the world listen,” said Mario Mota, a partner at Ottawa-based consultancy Boon Dog Professional Services. “This might be a subtle attempt at lobbying in some global markets – ‘We’re not a threat, we’re complementary; there’s no need to worry about Netflix."

    Canadian cutters

    Recent Canadian data is a little harder to come by. An annual report released this month by the Canadian Radio-television Communications Commission said the number of Canadian households with a television subscription increased by 1 per cent in 2012 to about 12 million.

    But the rate of growth appears to be slowing considerably. A report by Convergence found about 52,000 new subscriptions were set up in 2012. In the past, the industry could count on adding about 220,000 new subscribers each year.

    “I can point to at least four or five firms in the U.S. and Canada including our own whose analyses are showing some level of cord cutting or increased shaving,” said Kaan Yigit, president of Toronto-based Solutions Research Group. “No one has said it’s huge numbers but everyone agrees growth has stopped.”

    Canadian television executives have echoed Mr. Hastings assertion that Netflix and other services seem to be complementary to traditional packages, at least for now. But there are signs some cutting is starting to take – a summer report by Boon Dog said Canada’s publicly traded television providers lost 19,624 subscribers.

    Where are they all going? They haven’t said – but Mr. Eiley said Netflix could have three million subscribers in Canada by the end of the year (a gain of 800,000 in just a year).

    Somebody better tell Mr. Hastings.
    Last edited by PokerFace; 10-24-2013 at 03:37 AM.
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  18. #18
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    My OTA and cable tv viewing has decreased tremendously over the past few months as I have learned to rely on my online sources. I don't mind skipping much of the OTA content that isn't available online (or at least not consistently available for free), but I'll still watch the odd NFL game, talk show, or special via OTA or cable (in the laundry room).

    Over the past few months I watched some CBC content OTA ... only because I despise using the online CBC player for VOD content (even though it works, I find it sluggish, buggy and it shows annoying often-blaring commercials, that I mute and ignore) ... I even prefer the Acorn stair-lift commercials via CBC OTA that play over and over again during the early-morning hours (what a joke).

    http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/pulling-the-plug-on-traditional-tv-is-still-a-slow-moving-trend-in-canada-232262021.html

    [Pulling the plug on traditional TV is still a slow moving trend in Canada]

    11/17/2013

    Watching television on the Internet is cheap and convenient, but so far only a small number of Canadians have cut the cord on traditional viewing as TV providers offer discount prices and spend more on programs to keep customers who pay bigger monthly bills.

    The death of traditional TV watching has been exaggerated so far, say analysts who track viewing habits.

    "The truth of the matter is the revolution hasn't come," said Brahm Eiley of the Convergence Consulting Group in Toronto.

    It's slow moving with about 400,000 TV subscribers _ 3.5 per cent _ out of 11.8 million who have cut the cord since 2011, Eiley said, adding cord cutting started after the arrival of online subscription service Netflix in late 2010.

    "TV is not dead," Eiley said.

    Canadians watch about 28 hours of TV a week and another three hours on the Internet, according to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.
    But the movement to online viewing can't be ignored because it has a cost for TV providers. The average revenue that a TV customer generates is $65 monthly, compared with almost $45 for an Internet customer, Eiley said.


    [Click the above article link for more]
    Last edited by PokerFace; 11-21-2013 at 06:47 AM. Reason: spacing
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,463
    I tend to be in the 220GB to 330GB download/stream zone each month, but that's only because I tend to focus more on SD content than HD (to save time and space). Gulp, gulp, gulp.

    http://recode.net/2014/05/14/purge-p...own-bandwidth/
    [Cord Cutters gulp bandwidth - about 212GB/month - yummy!]
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

 

 

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