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  1. #1
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    SRC/CBC budget cuts: earlier analog shut down analog

    What You Should Know

    To minimize the need for reductions, CBC/Radio-Canada took a close look at the effect that the evolution of technology has had on the services it currently provides. As a result, the Corporation has decided to shut down its analogue over-the-air television broadcasting system sooner than anticipated. This represents almost $10 million in savings for CBC/Radio-Canada by 2013-14.

    While the system is used by very few Canadians, the useful life of CBC/Radio-Canada's analogue network is approaching its end, and becoming increasingly expensive to maintain. Analogue over-the-air TV service will cease on July 31, 2012.
    Read the full article here: http://cbc.radio-canada.ca/site/budget/en/

    By reading it, you'll notice that there's no mention whatsoever that any other transmitter (particularly in big and mid-size markets) will be upgraded to digital OTA.

    In other words, forget about CBC OTA in Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Saguenay, Saint John, Moncton, London, Saskatoon... and forget about Radio-Canada OTA in Calgary, Saint John, Fredericton, Halifax, Saskatoon, Windsor, Charlottetown... If you don't live in a city where a local CBC or SRC station is located, you'll be forced to get cable or satellite.
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    In other words, forget about CBC OTA in Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Saguenay, Saint John, Moncton, London, Saskatoon... and forget about Radio-Canada OTA in Calgary, Saint John, Fredericton, Halifax, Saskatoon, Windsor, Charlottetown... If you don't live in a city where a local CBC or SRC station is located, you'll be forced to get cable or satellite.
    Next phase of the Conservative attack on the CBC: Canadians without DTV OTA access to the CBC will get a credit on their taxes for what they would have paid for it.

    Piece by piece these monsters will destroy anything in Canada that isn't conservative.

  3. #3
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    It's ironic. I originally expected Bhell, Shaw and Rogers to succeed into convincing the CRTC to eliminate their OTA transmitters while still maintaining their simsub rights.

    Turns out, the public broadcaster abandons OTA broadcasting everywhere in Canada except in the big cities.

    What is Radio-Canada's mandate towards Canadians?
    What will the CRTC do towards that decision?

    Also worth mentionning, they'll sell off specialty "Bold" since they failed to change the channel's focus towards rural canada to soemthing they wanted, transform RCI (shortwave radio) to internet-only service, add commercial breaks on SRC/CBC Radio 2, cut regional programming in half, cutting off employee jobs...

    But nowhere are they cutting off any higher management jobs, which could save them at least 10 millions there.

    Also, a known personality hired to host a show on Radio-Canada gets a way much higher paycheck than a similar show on a private broadcaster such as TVA or V. There are savings to be made in programming without affecting its quality.
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NakedGord View Post
    Canadians without DTV OTA access to the CBC will get a credit on their taxes for what they would have paid for it.
    .
    This is what I think should happen! If CBC doesn't want to serve all Canadians over the air then they shouldn't receive taxpayer funding from all Canadians. Why should people who can't afford cable or satellite be cut off from the public broadcaster they are paying for with their tax dollars? If CBC didn't receive tax payer funding then it would be fine for them to make these kind of decisions, but taxpayers fund CBC.

  5. #5
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    [quote=InMontreal;54195]

    It's ironic. I originally expected Bhell, Shaw and Rogers to succeed into convincing the CRTC to eliminate their OTA transmitters while still maintaining their simsub rights.

    Turns out, the public broadcaster abandons OTA broadcasting everywhere in Canada except in the big cities.
    Yet the opposite is happening. Shaw plans to convert all of Global's rebroadcasters to digital. That's right, more over the air viewers will have access to Global, a private broadcaster they don't pay for, than the CBC, Canada's public broadcaster that they do pay for.

    What is Radio-Canada's mandate towards Canadians?
    Exactly, the CBC isn't following its own mandate.


    Also worth mentionning, they'll sell off specialty "Bold" since they failed to change the channel's focus towards rural canada to soemthing they wanted, transform RCI (shortwave radio) to internet-only service, add commercial breaks on SRC/CBC Radio 2, cut regional programming in half, cutting off employee jobs...
    What CBC forgot to mention is that if they get approved to do this it will cause financial harm to private radio stations. The advertising revenue CBC Radio gains will be at the expense of private radio stations that don't receive any taxpayer funding.

    But nowhere are they cutting off any higher management jobs, which could save them at least 10 millions there.
    They aren't even eliminating management incentive payments.

    Also, a known personality hired to host a show on Radio-Canada gets a way much higher paycheck than a similar show on a private broadcaster such as TVA or V.
    This is another huge problem with the CBC. You hear stories all the time about CBC employees earning more than employees in the private sector (especially in radio). Then there are little things like how they have co-anchors in every market. Why is the station with the lowest rated local news paying two evening anchor salaries instead of one? Why are stations building brand new sets? All of this adds up.


    There are savings to be made in programming without affecting its quality
    I agree. In fact some of these changes (like the real estate sales) should have been made anyway. It's almost like they are saying, "here are some of the ways we have been wasting taxpayer money over the years, now were finally going to stop, and were putting our future plans to waste money on hold".

    As sad as it is to see people lose their jobs, CBC shouldn't be immune just because it's the CBC. CTV, Global, and Citytv have all had to deal with layoffs and budget cuts over the years, so why should the CBC be exempt? The reality is there are more cost-effective ways to run the CBC without hurting on-air quality, this means some job cuts and salary reductions but that's just the way it is. Lots of other Government services are receiving budget cuts as well.

    Finally, although there are a lot of people out there that feel that the $1 Billion+ dollars the CBC receives could be better spent on something else (IMO it would be better spent on something like healthcare) there are people out there who value the CBC and are willing to pay for it, so why doesn't the CBC do pledge drives? Let the people who want to fund the CBC fund it. PBS does it, why can't CBC? The people who value the CBC and think it should receive more funding should have the option to fund it.

  6. #6
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    After reading many posts and reports from the media, I have a few more ideas.

    Do we still need CBC music (radio 2 and radio 3).
    You hear all the time good music and upcoming stars being found on youtube.
    So I think we should sell all of CBC radio 2 , 3.

    As for tv. If cbc can't afford all the transmitters why not sell them for $1 each to any one who wants them. Just because cbc can't pay there bills doesn't mean other tv stations would not like the locations and channels.

    There's lots ways to expand stations like CTS, Ntv, Joy tv or even Global or CTV.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aytononline View Post
    Do we still need CBC music (radio 2 and radio 3).
    You hear all the time good music and upcoming stars being found on youtube.
    So I think we should sell all of CBC radio 2 , 3.
    Youtube and commercial radio doesn't promote canadian music in every genre, even let's say, opera, jazz, world music, etc. Youtube doesn't replace public radio.

    Quote Originally Posted by aytononline View Post
    As for tv. If cbc can't afford all the transmitters why not sell them for $1 each to any one who wants them. Just because cbc can't pay there bills doesn't mean other tv stations would not like the locations and channels.

    There's lots ways to expand stations like CTS, Ntv, Joy tv or even Global or CTV.
    - All of 620 remaining analog broadcast equipment are worthless since the analog shutdown on August 31, 2011, except the transmission towers in SOME sites. The CRTC won't allow for any private content to replace the CBC's/SRC's in analog form.
    - CBC/SRC is departing them to save money, it would be a financial burden to any private broadcaster to resume operations in small cities they never heard of before.
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aytononline View Post

    As for tv. If cbc can't afford all the transmitters why not sell them for $1 each to any one who wants them. Just because cbc can't pay there bills doesn't mean other tv stations would not like the locations and channels.
    No one really wants TV transmitter anymore, most of telvision viewers are switching to online streaming.

    Besides, a majority of the markets that the CBC has analog transmitter is where most of the people hate the CBC itself, so let them pull out; those markets aren't paying anymore with their taxes.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    If CBC doesn't want to serve all Canadians over the air then they shouldn't receive taxpayer funding from all Canadians.
    Ha! The CBC does want to be available to as many Canadians as possible. Their analog transmitters reached 98% of the population, but with these budget cuts they have to make hard choices. Would you be willing to pay more taxes so the CBC can transmit OTA in Trois-Rivières?

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    That's right, more over the air viewers will have access to Global, a private broadcaster they don't pay for, than the CBC, Canada's public broadcaster that they do pay for.
    Private broadcasters' big motivation to keep OTA transmitters is that they need them to keep their simsub rights. That's not an issue for the CBC.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    This is what I think should happen! If CBC doesn't want to serve all Canadians over the air then they shouldn't receive taxpayer funding from all Canadians. Why should people who can't afford cable or satellite be cut off from the public broadcaster they are paying for with their tax dollars? If CBC didn't receive tax payer funding then it would be fine for them to make these kind of decisions, but taxpayers fund CBC.
    I always found that a funny demand, "I don't want my tax dollars spent on....", how does one know that they're tax dollars are being spent on the CBC? Does one not realize that other tax and non-tax revune pay for the CBC? (corporate tax, GST, royalties, etc). Maybe if people get mad at the CBC on how its run, other than just about it spending money that may or not be theirs, maybe we can finally make progress on fixing the issues its been having.

    Just saying.


    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    [...] there are people out there who value the CBC and are willing
    to pay for it, so why doesn't the CBC do pledge drives? Let the people who want to fund the CBC fund it. PBS does it, why can't CBC? The people who value the CBC and think it should receive more funding should have the option to fund it.
    Maybe because the PBS model of funding and governance is consider to be catastrophic failure every mensurable way? Its why other non-American Industrialized countries like Canada follow the BBC model in some form of public broadcasting.
    • NHK (Japan)
    • ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
    • BBC (UK)
    • Euronews (EU)
    • France Télévisions (France)
    And those are just the few I can pull out of the top of my head.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    No one really wants TV transmitter anymore, most of telvision viewers are switching to online streaming. .
    Myself and many OTA'ers would disagree.


    Besides, a majority of the markets that the CBC has analog transmitter is where most of the people hate the CBC itself, so let them pull out; those markets aren't paying anymore with their taxes.
    In theory I agree however it is incumbent for progressives to provide an OTA alternative voice for the disenfranchised in Conservative areas. Mind you I'm not saying the CBC is progressive (certainly not) but I still stand by that position.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    I always found that a funny demand, "I don't want my tax dollars spent on....", how does one know that they're tax dollars are being spent on the CBC?
    I'm waiting for an option to be added to the tax form to opt-in to funding the military or get a tax rebate if you don't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NakedGord View Post
    In theory I agree however it is incumbent for progressives to provide an OTA alternative voice for the disenfranchised in Conservative areas. Mind you I'm not saying the CBC is progressive (certainly not) but I still stand by that position.
    It was to merely point out the faulty logic that is used, I thought if they can spume the same ill-logic, why can't I?


    Quote Originally Posted by NakedGord View Post
    I'm waiting for an option to be added to the tax form to opt-in to funding the military or get a tax rebate if you don't.
    Didn't you know? Once the government classifies as "patriotic" you can't opt out of it.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  13. #13
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    CBC/SRC submitted their request to shut down all analog transmitters. Look for document 2012-0509-7 :
    https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/inst...lt-Defaut.aspx

    Concerning CBC North Yellowknife...
    The Corporation will cease the analog television service (CFYK-TV) on July 31 and commence the digital service (CFYK-DT) on August 1, 2012. All the associated analog re-transmitters will be shut down on July 31, 2012.
    There are no other planned conversion to digital, and no riding of CBC or SRC as a digital sub-channel in the markets where there's no "other language" station, which is bad news for Trois-Rivières, Sherbrooke, Saguenay, St-John NB, Windsor, and other markets where digital conversion was required.

    If you disagree with the CBC's decision, you have until June 18 to submit an opposition. Go to the CRTC's link above, click on the Submit button and follow instructions.
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  14. #14
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    Latest developments on May 25th, 2012.

    Communities Should Be Offered CBC Transmitters Slated for July Shutdown
    http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/9806...-july-shutdown

    Suggestion by Cactus that CBC/Radio-Canada should offer its analogue infrastructure to communities
    http://cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/media-centre/2012/05/25/
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

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    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    Not a surprise really. It's a shame that millions of Canadians will lose over the air access to our public broadcaster.

  17. #17
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    12. The Commission has also considered the impact of this change on OLMCs (official language minority communities). Although numerous parties, such as the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne and the City of Windsor, accepted the CBC’s reasons for shutting down its analog transmitters, they noted that the shutdown will eliminate OLMC television service to those households that currently access such programming via the CBC’s over-the-air signals. Other interveners, such as the English Language Arts Network and the Commissioner of Official Languages, also expressed concern that in preparing for the shutdown, the CBC did not adequately communicate the shutdown’s impact to OLMCs, nor did the CBC adequately explore alternative solutions for maintaining service to OLMCs.

    13. The Commission takes note of the above-mentioned concerns and will discuss the delivery of the CBC’s services to OLMCs at its upcoming licence renewal.
    What does that mean anyway?
    Shutdown all analog transmitters now, take down the transmitter sites and towers, and wait for the CBC's renewal in 2013 to find alternatives to get a CBC signal?

    11. The Commission notes the availability of alternatives, including a free basic service offering certain CBC television services that is provided by Shaw Direct TV as part the Local Television Satellite Solution (LTSS).
    I was living in an appartment where the owner prohibited satellite dishes on his building, even if it's hidden of the rooftop. The only cable provider available, Vidéotron, is not offering any alternative, it costs a minimum of 23$+taxes to get BASIC service, and 3$ more for the HD signal. The Commission mentions "availability of alternatives", plural form. What ARE the alternatives other than Shaw Direct?
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emarsee View Post
    Not a surprise really. It's a shame that millions of Canadians will lose over the air access to our public broadcaster.
    It's the (sad) way how the world works. We don't want to spend $35 a/year in taxes for the CBC, but we're all willing to pay $70-100+ for a BDU service with duplicate programming on every other channel.


    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    What does that mean anyway?
    Shutdown all analog transmitters now, take down the transmitter sites and towers, and wait for the CBC's renewal in 2013 to find alternatives to get a CBC signal?
    I think their either banking on the fact the government might reverse the funding cut decision, or finding revenue through other ways such as VFS, which is more plausible.



    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    The Commission mentions "availability of alternatives", plural form. What ARE the alternatives other than Shaw Direct?
    For people, like yourself, who live in apartments or condos, they're referring to IPTV services such as Bell Fibe or Telus Optik which is nothing more than a dedicated web stream of broadcasts from a server at Bell or Telus HQ.

    Other alternatives can be web streams from sites like the CBC. It's been well know that the "Millennial Generation" are more and more getting news and television series from the web and that its been discussed that the CBC should become a content provider rather than just a broadcaster. So that can be consider another alternative.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  19. #19
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    Interesting. That was psoted yesterday morning, a few hours before the CRTC decision.

    CACTUS Asks for Consultation Before Shutting Down CBC Transmission Sites
    (...)
    Despite this overwhelming willingness of Canadians to work with the CBC to keep their TV signals free, the CBC has stated that it is not planning to consult affected communities and wants “fair market value” for its equipment, even if communities are willing to maintain it. In one instance (Penticton), a school board and local ISP representative was told that he could obtain the CBC's otherwise useless analog transmitter for over $80,000!
    Source: http://www.broadcastermagazine.com/n...tes/1001545443

    Something wrong here. The CBC publicly says their analog transmitters are old, there's a lack of replacement equipment, in other words, they're worthless junk. But when a community proposes to take over the transmitter, 80K a pop is a "fair market value". Huh?

    It's clear their ultimate goal was to shut down all analog transmitters with no exceptions, but there's some kind of motivation behind this. Maybe value-for-signal (subscription revenues from cable/satellite providers)? Maybe they're expecting some special fund?
    We had a good run: 2006 to 2020. Thanks for the informations and debates.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    Something wrong here. The CBC publicly says their analog transmitters are old, there's a lack of replacement equipment, in other words, they're worthless junk. But when a community proposes to take over the transmitter, 80K a pop is a "fair market value". Huh?
    CBC and CACTUS have been fighting over the old analog transmitters as far back as May, since TVO agreed to donate its soon to be shutdown analog transmitters and sites to CACTUS.

    I think CBC wants the money for expanding transmitters else where, I know there are a few applications on the CRTC site by the CBC to add new FM transmitters in Quebec for Radio One.


    Quote Originally Posted by InMontreal View Post
    It's clear their ultimate goal was to shut down all analog transmitters with no exceptions, but there's some kind of motivation behind this. Maybe value-for-signal (subscription revenues from cable/satellite providers)? Maybe they're expecting some special fund?
    Those could be it too, but I always wounder if it was because they where removing it from areas that where the anti-CBC rhetoric was high, like London Ontario. So with a 10% cut in funding and a loss of a transmitter we can at least say they're no longer paying for the CBC.

    I think the CBC is simply expanding where hthere is demand, radio and web. CBC Radio One (English) is outperforming in major markets and is or was planning to expand into surrounding markers. And the Internet for a generation who is getting more and more of their news from online sites like Youtube. They're just doing what we want them to-do, spend the money where the demand is the highest. Anything else is charity.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

 

 

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