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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    152

    Internet and Cable Provider

    After an extremely long time of saying I am not getting the internet in my home, I feel I am being forced to get it because software providers and others are forcing user to download their updates directly to the computer, and does not give you the option of downloading it using a usb.

    Can anyone recommend an internet provider that gives excellent customer service at a reasonal price? I am even willing to get a bundled deal that includes my cable, phone and internet. There are so many offers out there but I would prefer choosing a package recommend by someone who has nothing to gain from my purchase except knowing that I am a happy customer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    152

    Teksavvy?

    After doing some more research, I am thinking of using Teksavvy as my Internet Provider. I am concerned that this company may not be the one I should choose because of my lack of tech/computer knowledge and my need for tech support. For example, most of the terms mention on the sites I do not understand.

    I would greatly appreciate receiving advice/recommendations as to the pros and the cons of going with Teksavvy as my Internet Provider.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,461

    Icon3 How much is that ISP in the window?

    A lot depends on where you live and if you want to bundle your Internet/Phone/TV services with one provider.

    By the way, I live in Toronto, so I don't have access to many of the various ISPs that are available in other provinces.

    Even if you don't have a clue about any Internet terms, the CSRs (of any company) will often offer to remotely connect to your computer and help you better understand what's going on, once you've joined (not that you need to let them do this, but it is a possibility to help reduce some of the overwhelming feelings that newbies might encounter).

    It's not fun trying to find reliable companies that don't charge a setup/installation fee (for DSL, at least) and also let you use a variety of different modems with their service, assuming that you already own a modem (although sometimes the cheapest modems might not work very well, so an upgrade might unfortunately be necessary).

    I didn't go with Teksavvy because I didn't want to pay any connection fees and I also didn't want to have a modem shipped out to me (I didn't have a modem at the time and still don't have a clue as to what modems are the best).

    For Internet related queries, I would suggest reading:

    http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=28
    [Internet, Landline and Wireless Providers]

    http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=71435
    [Looking for ISP Providers/digitalhome]

    It was easy to find minor and major flaws with every ISP that I researched, so I just decided to visit one of them and then signed-up with a money-back guarantee (just in case I couldn't get the cheap modem to work -- it didn't work, so I needed to go back and get their more expensive wireless model).

    For standard DSL service (which is what I have -- I can always go to the Library if I need more bandwidth for downloading multiple files at higher speeds), I was thinking about trying Distributel (even though I previously had 3web/Distributel and suffered through many frustrating service outages as a dial-up customer), Primus, Teksavvy, Yesupnet, and Worldline (among others).

    24-hour technical support was important to me, but now that I'm more comfortable with using my high-speed Internet connection (although I still haven't tried any wireless connections for streaming), I rarely if ever bother calling for help (I'm often put on hold for too long, so I just hang up and call back several times until I get connected after waiting for 5 minutes or less). I don't expect to get help right away, but some of the automated phone systems are poorly managed and desperately need to be updated. Having just one person manning the help lines in the wee hours of the morning, isn't what I'd call efficient 24-hour tech support, but at least I've yet to have any of my minor/major problems go unsolved for too long. I've also never lost access to the Internet (although I do get the occasional lost network connection for some downloads, but they are very rare).

    Persistence and patience is often necessary to get over the learning curve of trying out various different ISPs, but whatever service you end up trying first (or last), I hope you don't let yourself get overwhelmed by the entire process and instead just relax and please accept the fact that there's no such thing as a "perfect" ISP.

    I don't have anything really negative to say about any of the various ISPs, but after reading so many extremely negative things about Comwave, that's one company that I would never bother with ... even if it was free for 6 months.

    Disclaimer: I've never personally tried Comwave, so I can't be sure that I wouldn't enjoy the service ... I'm just saying that I'm too scared to even bother with it ... I'm also too afraid to discuss my own ISP (no major complaints so far), for fear that the big boys will try to crush it (low-priced unlimited broadband is not something that Rogers, Bell and the gang are comfortable with).

    Good luck and happy surfing! :chuncky:
    Last edited by PokerFace; 12-25-2012 at 11:16 AM. Reason: typo for Worldline (left out one of the l's)
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    4,741
    I'll explain my path.

    Since 2000, I was on DSL (internet on phone line) with independent providers, with Bell for telephone sevice and Videotron for TV Cable.
    Not using much the phone service, I used to pay around 23$ per month + 43 cents per minute for each long distance so I switched to Teksavvy's home phone service (20$ but 3$ for call display and 3 cents per minute long distance) with Teksavvy's DSL service. Then I shopped around 2 years ago for a Linksys ATA (analog phone adaptor, 50$) for VoIP service, so it now costs less than 5$ per month for phone service with voip.ms.

    But moving my phone line to VoIP meant that I had to order dry-loop for my DSL line, which means Bell was making 10$ more per month from me since I didn't have a dial tone. Since february 2012, internet on cable is way more affordable for wholesale and faster, so I switched to Electronicbox for cable internet service (DOCSIS 3 cable modem costs 100$), so instead of paying 40$ for DSL or 46$ for cable internet from Videotron (or 56$ if I take the internet service alone!), I pay 32$ for the internet with an acceptable monthly cap.

    As for television, I brought an exterior antenna, set it up on the roof (around 250$), so I get conventional channels (CBC, CTV, Global, Citytv, SRC, TVA, V, TQc, only network missing is CTV2) with a few US networks (PBS, Fox, CBS, NBC) for free and in high-definition. I'm currently shopping for an antenna-compatible PVR.

    In the end, per month, I pay 32$+tx for internet, less than 5$ for telephone, and nothing for television.

    I have an iPhone without service, so using the router's wi-fi, I created a free account on Apple website and I can load apps, including CTV, Global and Citytv, so I can watch shows I missed within 2-3 weeks after its airdate. All video data uses the internet. With a free VoIP app, I can make and receive phone calls on my iPhone using my existing VoIP account, as long as I'm on a wi-fi network, which includes places with free wi-fi such as Subway or McDo or the workplace.

    Money saved can be redirected somewhere else, such as buying or rent Blu-Ray of HBO shows when they come out, or rent them for free at the library.

    This situation is not ideal for everyone. Live sporting events can be found at some local bar, kids can find shows on the internet (plug computer to TV screen) or on conventional TV at specific times, you miss out on 24/7 news channels, you have less choices, but at least it you save money.

    Bundles on Rogers, Shaw, and Bell can make you seem like you're saving money, but they still make huge profits.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    152
    Greetings:

    Your path seems very complicated to me because I only understood half of what you wrote. I am not familiar with the tech jargon. I will do some more research and re-read your comment and see if I understand it better.

    I greatly appreciated you taking the time to comment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    4,741
    Quote Originally Posted by Avonregal View Post
    Your path seems very complicated to me because I only understood half of what you wrote. I am not familiar with the tech jargon.
    Let me break it down for you.

    - Television : antenna on the roof, directly plugged on an High definition television set. Free service.

    - Internet : it's cheaper to take internet from independent service provider, but in most cases, you need to buy or rent a modem that will be shipped out and pay installation fees, but you'll still save loads of money on the long run.

    - Home phone : VoIP stands Voice-over-IP, meaning your phone service transits throught your internet connection instead of the Bell phone central. Off course, during a power outage or if your internet connection is down, your phone service is down as well. But from most providers, you get call display, voicemail and other options for free or for peanuts.

    Most people have a cellphone, so it's useful for emergencies. Cellphone without service (or without a SIM card) will always have access to 911, as long as there's a charged battery inside.
    Last edited by InMontreal; 12-28-2012 at 08:49 PM.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    152

    Internet and Cable Provider

    Thanks for the translation.

    I am going to do some comparison shopping by seeing what kind of deals are available for bundling my phone and internet between both Bell and Rogers subcontractors, then start from there.

    Regards,

 

 

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