Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook
Register
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204

    CBC to reduce local 90 minute evening news to 1 hour or 30 minutes




    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/cbc-to...ions-1.2688409

    The CBC is shifting its priorities from television and radio to digital and mobile services, a move that will reduce staff, and supper-hour news broadcasts and programs produced in-house, says CBC president and CEO Hubert T. Lacroix.

    “We used to lead with television and radio. Web came and then mobility came. We are reversing, we are inverting the priorities that we have,” Lacroix said, referring to the broadcaster’s 2020 strategy. “We’re going to lead now with mobility, we’re going to lead with whatever widget you use.

    "You’re going to see an investment in mobility that’s going to rise as the investment in perhaps television ... is reduced.”

    Lacroix said there will be job cuts over the coming years, but they will be made in "prudent steps."

    In 2020, the corporation will have 1,000 to 1,500 fewer employees. This would be in addition to the reductions announced to date.

    Currently, 1,000 employees are eligible for retirement and through attrition, while about 300 leave every year, according to the broadcaster.

    “The goal is that to be able to meet a financially stable and sustainable CBC/Radio-Canada, we have to reduce the infrastructures ... but we also have to reduce the number of people who are working at CBC/Radio-Canada,” Lacroix said.

    In April, Lacroix announced that funding shortfalls and revenue losses had forced the broadcaster to cut $130 million from its budget this year, a move that the CBC said will eliminate 657 jobs over the next two years and take the network out of competing for the rights to broadcast professional sports.

    But Lacroix characterized Thursday’s announcement as “a good day, it’s an important day. This is a plan that’s going to work.”
    No stations to close, Lacroix says

    Lacroix said CBC won’t close any of its stations across the country, but the 90-minute evening television newscasts will be reduced to either 30 minutes or 60 minutes.

    “The base service across Canada is going to be 30 minutes. In some regions, depending on whether they’re successful, the reaction of the audience, where there are revenue opportunities, our mandate, minority language commitments, conditions of licence, we are then going to go in some of these markets to 60 minutes.”

    Those services will be augmented by mobile and web services, he said.

    The CBC's move to “significantly reduce” in-house production across the organization will exclude news current affairs and radio. This will mean fewer documentaries directly produced by the broadcaster.

    “Why are we doing this? Again, to scale it down, to be able to open our content creation to other actors, other participants in the cultural industry,” Lacroix said.
    'We're in the business of content'

    A number of CBC personalities have gone public with their opposition to the cuts.

    Lacroix said this doesn’t mean the CBC is “out of docs [documentaries],” but instead will use the whole of the creative community to fill the slots.

    “To be the public broadcaster, we don’t need to be always the producer,” he said.

    The CBC also plans to cut its real estate presence in half by approximately two million square feet.

    At the Montreal station, for example, there will be a “substantial reduction in square feet.” Toronto will also try to reduce its real estate by acquiring new tenants.

    “If there should be an offer on the building, yes, we’d take it, but the offer on the building would not necessarily mean that we’d move away. We’d become a tenant.

    “We’re not in the business of real estate. We’re in the business of content,” Lacroix added.



    No word on the time slots for these new 30 minute or 1 hour evening newscasts. One positive is that it appears local late night newscasts will remain.

    I don't see 30 minute / 1 hour local evening newscasts as a bad thing, what's bad is that they are doing this to eliminate jobs. There is a difference between producing a 30 minute newscast because it's a strategic scheduling move (which is what CTV and Global do in some markets) and producing a 30 minute newscast because you don't have the resources to produce anything more, and that unfortunately appears to be what's happening at CBC.

    Another unknown is which stations will get an hour or 30 minutes. They say the more successful markets will get a full hour but there aren't any markets where CBC is successful. They will probably have large markets with 1 hour with smaller markets getting the 30 minutes.

    Here's the amount of local evening/late night news by CBC's competitors in each market

    Vancouver
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours and 30 minutes

    Edmonton
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours and 30 minutes

    Calgary
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours and 30 minutes

    Lethbridge
    CTV: 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Regina
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Saskatoon
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Winnipeg
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Toronto
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours

    Montreal
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour

    Maritimes
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Greater Toronto Area
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post


    I don't see 30 minute / 1 hour local evening newscasts as a bad thing, what's bad is that they are doing this to eliminate jobs. There is a difference between producing a 30 minute newscast because it's a strategic scheduling move (which is what CTV and Global do in some markets) and producing a 30 minute newscast because you don't have the resources to produce anything more, and that unfortunately appears to be what's happening at CBC.



    What do you expect from years of budget cuts, but even in the Internet age we still need an third national broadcaster that can produce local, national and international news that isn't an CP, AP or Returns article.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post


    Another unknown is which stations will get an hour or 30 minutes. They say the more successful markets will get a full hour but there aren't any markets where CBC is successful. They will probably have large markets with 1 hour with smaller markets getting the 30 minutes.
    More than likely Vancouver, Toronto and some maritime provinces will have an hour newscast, while all other markets will shrink. Personally, I think they should mimc CTV's late local and national news; have The National reduced to half-hour and move to 11:00pm and have local late night news moved to 11:30pm
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=Mayhem;66432]


    What do you expect from years of budget cuts, but even in the Internet age we still need an third national broadcaster that can produce local, national and international news that isn't an CP, AP or Returns article.
    CBC is making their own decisions on what to cut though, and I maintain that they are responsible for their non-existent local news ratings due to the way their news is scheduled and their overall commitment. If CBC's local news had higher ratings they would have more revenue and wouldn't need to make as many cuts. Budget cuts aren't the reason CBC's local evening news only has around 10,000 viewers in Vancouver and 3,000 viewers in Calgary.

    What they should do is eliminate French news outside of Quebec. The fact that they are producing French newscasts in cities where only a small tiny non-existent fraction of the population can speak the language is just absurd, especially since it's very unlikely that French is the only language these few people understand in these markets. The vast majority can't speak French and the vast majority of the minority who can is bilingual. Instead of serving a non-existent minority with a cheap under funded newscast they should devote the resources to their English newscasts. There are so many communities across Canada CBC does not serve with local news, yet Vancouver has a French language newscast. If the CBC is going to cherry pick their priorities, this should certainly be one of them.


    More than likely Vancouver, Toronto and some maritime provinces will have an hour newscast, while all other markets will shrink. Personally, I think they should mimc CTV's late local and national news; have The National reduced to half-hour and move to 11:00pm and have local late night news moved to 11:30pm
    I disagree. Yes, 10:00PM means The National airs against hit network programming, but they are not going to gain viewers going up against CTV National News and Global's News Hour Final, and by moving it to 11:00PM they risk losing the audience they have as there is no guarantee that the people who watch The National at 10:00PM will wait to 11:00PM, and the people who are willing to wait may just decide to watch CTV National News or News Hour Final instead. In addition, local news at 11:30PM would put it against both News Hour Final and CTV's local 11:30PM newscast.
    Last edited by TVViewer; 06-27-2014 at 12:27 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Greater Toronto Area
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    CBC is making their own decisions on what to cut though, and I maintain that they are responsible for their non-existent local news ratings due to the way their news is scheduled and their overall commitment. If CBC's local news had higher ratings they would have more revenue and wouldn't need to make as many cuts. Budget cuts aren't the reason CBC's local evening news only has around 10,000 viewers in Vancouver and 3,000 viewers in Calgary.


    But how do you improve if viewers haven't changed its prefer newscast in over thirty years?

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    What they should do is eliminate French news outside of Quebec. The fact that they are producing French newscasts in cities where only a small tiny non-existent fraction of the population can speak the language is just absurd, especially since it's very unlikely that French is the only language these few people understand in these markets. The vast majority can't speak French and the vast majority of the minority who can is bilingual. Instead of serving a non-existent minority with a cheap under funded newscast they should devote the resources to their English newscasts. There are so many communities across Canada CBC does not serve with local news, yet Vancouver has a French language newscast. If the CBC is going to cherry pick their priorities, this should certainly be one of them.

    Without any doubt the CBC would drop French language newscasts, television and radio stations outside Quebec in an heartbeat if it could, hoverver it's law that they must provide both English and French television and radio services through Canada. What they could and should have done is make Radio-Canada an digital OTA sub-channel outside of Quebec, reducing the costs of maintaining two OTA transmitter down to one.

    As for eliminating French language newscasts altogether outside Quebec, I doubt that will ever happen any time soon, seeing its would be too much of an political hot potato that no politician will bring up.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    I disagree. Yes, 10:00PM means The National airs against hit network programming, but they are not going to gain viewers going up against CTV National News and Global's News Hour Final, and by moving it to 11:00PM they risk losing the audience they have as there is no guarantee that the people who watch The National at 10:00PM will wait to 11:00PM, and the people who are willing to wait may just decide to watch CTV National News or News Hour Final instead. In addition, local news at 11:30PM would put it against both News Hour Final and CTV's local 11:30PM newscast.
    Well, CTV National News is doing something right, It's in the top 30; and Global's News Hour Final I didn't include because its local news orientated while CTV National News and CBC The National coverage is national and international news, I put CBC Late Nigh at 11:30 because they need something anyways to fill the void after George Stroumboulopoulos leaves in the fall.

    I should also point out that CBC The National ratings do not include any PPM viewing data from CBC News Network.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=Mayhem;66490]

    But how do you improve if viewers haven't changed its prefer newscast in over thirty years?
    You be as good as your competitors with the same commitment to news as your competitors, and CBC has not done this at all. CBC made the decision to compete against CTV and Global's news with just a 5 day a week evening news block while CTV and Global were producing several newscasts throughout the day 7 days a week. Expecting to be successful with this strategy was idiotic. Even the person responsible for CBC's local news strategy is now saying it was a mistake and the CBC should have left local news to the private broadcasters.

    The whole idea to compete against them anyway didn't make sense in the first place. As a public broadcaster, they should have focused on the markets the private broadcasters were not serving with local news. Instead they made the decision to compete against the private broadcasters local news while making far less of a commitment than the private broadcasters.


    Without any doubt the CBC would drop French language newscasts, television and radio stations outside Quebec in an heartbeat if it could, hoverver it's law that they must provide both English and French television and radio services through Canada. What they could and should have done is make Radio-Canada an digital OTA sub-channel outside of Quebec, reducing the costs of maintaining two OTA transmitter down to one.

    As for eliminating French language newscasts altogether outside Quebec, I doubt that will ever happen any time soon, seeing its would be too much of an political hot potato that no politician will bring up.

    Not every market they serve has local newscast in both English and French, but some do, and they should be eliminated.



    Well, CTV National News is doing something right, It's in the top 30;
    Which is why I don't think CBC should put The National against it. The 3rd place national newscast is not going to gain viewers moving directly against the #1 national newscast. It's also not realistic that everyone who watches The National at 10:00PM will continue to watch the program at 11:00PM. Some may watch The National because it's on at 10:00PM and 11:00PM is too late, etc.

    and Global's News Hour Final I didn't include because its local news orientated while CTV National News and CBC The National coverage is national and international news,

    It's still a newscast though (and like all of Global's local newscasts, does cover national and international stories) and is going to have more audience overlap vs a primetime drama. The National would go from being the only newscast in its time slot to a newscast going up against two established 11:00PM newscasts.

    I put CBC Late Nigh at 11:30 because they need something anyways to fill the void after George Stroumboulopoulos leaves in the fall.

    I should also point out that CBC The National ratings do not include any PPM viewing data from CBC News Network.
    Which is where a lot of the audience could go if The National moved to 11:00PM on CBC. Also, CBC News Network airs The National at 11:00PM, so that kind of gives them an idea of how it would perform in the slot.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post


    But how do you improve if viewers haven't changed its prefer newscast in over thirty years?
    How do they expect viewers to find their newscast when they have such an inconsistent schedule?

    CBC Vancouver is replacing their flagship evening anchor Gloria Macarenko (who is moving to CBC Radio) with CBC Montreal's Andrew Chang. (this appears to be a cost cutting decision as there is nothing really strategic about replacing your flagship anchor with someone from another market your viewers are not familiar with, but it does reduce costs by eliminating a co-anchor position at CBC Montreal). In the press release it states where you can catch CBC News Vancouver
    "CBC News Vancouver airs weeknights at 5, 6 and 11 pm, Saturdays at 10:30 pm and Sundays at 11 pm on CBC TV. CBC News Vancouver can also be seen on CHEK TV 7 nights a week at 6 pm."
    Yet the schedule for CBC Vancouver all summer (the press release was issued in July) and at least for September has CBC News Vancouver Saturdays at 10:00PM, NOT 10:30PM, with The National at 6:00PM (directly against CBC News Vancouver on CHEK, which results in them competing against themselves).

    When you can't even figure out the correct time slots for your own newscasts in your own press release (they released the same incorrect time again in August), it's a pretty good indication you are not doing a good job at scheduling news. Maybe it moves to 10:30PM in October when hockey comes in, but that's even worse as it means the late night newscast not only doesn’t air at the same time 7 days a week but doesn't even air at the same time each Saturday year round.

    Instead of demoting and replacing anchors, CBC should come up with a realistic schedule for their newscasts. For starters, if they are going to produce a 6:00PM newscast 7 days a week, it should actually air on CBC 7 days a week. It makes zero sense for them to air local CBC News on CHEK and air The National at the same time on CBC. Also, if they are going to produce a local late night newscast 7 days a week, it should air at the same time 7 days a week. This is a perfect example of what's wrong with the CBC, what they are doing is not working well at all, it wastes money and is a ridiculous way to build an audience and serve viewers but it's done anyway because it's the CBC.

    Oh yeah, last night Alberta got a new premier. While CTV and Global produced special primetime coverage beginning at 7:00PM, CBC Calgary and CBC Edmonton continued with regular CBC network programming. Of course, CBC Calgary and Edmonton don't have any local newscasts on weekends, just a 30 minute regional Alberta newscast which airs Saturdays at 11:30PM and Sundays at 11:00PM (of course they make sure it airs at different times each night)
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    885
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    CBC Vancouver is replacing their flagship evening anchor Gloria Macarenko (who is moving to CBC Radio) with CBC Montreal's Andrew Chang. (this appears to be a cost cutting decision as there is nothing really strategic about replacing your flagship anchor with someone from another market your viewers are not familiar with, but it does reduce costs by eliminating a co-anchor position at CBC Montreal). ... Instead of demoting and replacing anchors, ...
    It was a strange move for Gloria. She's been there a long time so I can understand that she might want to try something else, but most people would look at it as a major step down. If the CBC did tell her they couldn't afford to renew her contract and she wants to continue in hard news, she'll have other options.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Maybe it moves to 10:30PM in October when hockey comes in, but that's even worse as it means the late night newscast not only doesn’t air at the same time 7 days a week but doesn't even air at the same time each Saturday year round.
    CBC should come up with a realistic schedule for their newscasts. For starters, if they are going to produce a 6:00PM newscast 7 days a week, it should actually air on CBC 7 days a week. It makes zero sense for them to air local CBC News on CHEK and air The National at the same time on CBC. Also, if they are going to produce a local late night newscast 7 days a week, it should air at the same time 7 days a week. This is a perfect example of what's wrong with the CBC, what they are doing is not working well at all, it wastes money and is a ridiculous way to build an audience and serve viewers but it's done anyway because it's the CBC.
    They do have news at 6 at 10 everyday, it's just that The National moves. As for moving the news for live sports, everyone does that.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=SportsFan;67066]

    It was a strange move for Gloria. She's been there a long time so I can understand that she might want to try something else, but most people would look at it as a major step down. If the CBC did tell her they couldn't afford to renew her contract and she wants to continue in hard news, she'll have other options.

    Now that The Q needs a new host, maybe CBC will be able to offer her a more high profile role at CBC Radio
    They do have news at 6 at 10 everyday, it's just that The National moves.

    They don't broadcast news at 6:00PM and 10:00PM every day on CBC, they don't even broadcast evening and late night news every day on CBC. I could understand them having CBC News on CHEK when CBC is airing something like HNIC on Saturdays (although it makes less sense now that they don't make any money off hockey) but keeping it exclusively on CHEK when hockey isn't on, and then airing it at the exact same time as The National on Saturday nights is something only the CBC would think makes sense. Also, they could easily move the Sunday U.S. movie to 4:00PM to accommodate a local 6:00PM newscast on CBC.


    As for moving the news for live sports, everyone does that.

    Nobody does it more than the CBC. They are now even pre-empting news for a sport they get no revenue from.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    885
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Now that The Q needs a new host, maybe CBC will be able to offer her a more high profile role at CBC Radio
    Gloria will be hosting B.C. Almanac (CBC B.C.'s noon show) starting in January. That's a little higher profile, but not much. I'd be surprised if they'd want her for Q. I expect they'll want someone with more experience in arts and culture.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    They don't broadcast news at 6:00PM and 10:00PM every day on CBC,
    They did when I wrote that. We both knew what was going to happen on Saturdays when the NHL season started. Since then they moved the The National back to 10 pm Sundays and pushed the local news back an hour.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Also, they could easily move the Sunday U.S. movie to 4:00PM to accommodate a local 6:00PM newscast on CBC.
    That would make sense. Although, I think Vancouver is the only CBC station producing evening news on the weekends now, so it would make promoting their Sunday movie a little more complicated if it was on at a different time in BC.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=SportsFan;67416]


    Gloria will be hosting B.C. Almanac (CBC B.C.'s noon show) starting in January. That's a little higher profile, but not much. I'd be surprised if they'd want her for Q. I expect they'll want someone with more experience in arts and culture.


    It could still open a more high profile spot for her somewhere at CBC Radio.
    They did when I wrote that. We both knew what was going to happen on Saturdays when the NHL season started. Since then they moved the The National back to 10 pm Sundays and pushed the local news back an hour.
    No, they did not broadcast news at 6:00PM and 10:00PM on CBC every day when you wrote that.

    That would make sense. Although, I think Vancouver is the only CBC station producing evening news on the weekends now, so it would make promoting their Sunday movie a little more complicated if it was on at a different time in BC
    Which is another problem. In some markets they are employing people on the weekend and only getting a late night newscast out of them. It's even worse in some markets like the Maritimes where they only have a 10 minute regional newscast on Sundays. How is that a good use of money and resources? It's a beyond inefficient way to operate. They schedule CBC News in a way that is just so out of touch with what Canadians want and pretty much impossible to build an audience.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    885
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    No, they did not broadcast news at 6:00PM and 10:00PM on CBC every day when you wrote that.
    When do you think they weren't broadcasting news?
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Which is another problem. In some markets they are employing people on the weekend and only getting a late night newscast out of them. It's even worse in some markets like the Maritimes where they only have a 10 minute regional newscast on Sundays. How is that a good use of money and resources? It's a beyond inefficient way to operate.
    I assume it costs the CBC less to do shorter newscasts and only one a day on weekends. I suppose it would be more efficient if the same stories were run on the evening and nightly news, but it would cost money that they don't have to produce a second newscast. What would you have them do?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=SportsFan;67426]

    When do you think they weren't broadcasting news?
    Sunday nights at 6:00PM

    I assume it costs the CBC less to do shorter newscasts and only one a day on weekends. I suppose it would be more efficient if the same stories were run on the evening and nightly news, but it would cost money that they don't have to produce a second newscast. What would you have them do?
    I disagree that they don't have the money to have the existing weekend crew produce both an evening and late night newscast. My theory is they want to keep the strong lead-in the movie provides to their primetime lineup. They know that local CBC News is going to do much worse than the U.S. movie and they don't want to lose that lead-in. I have no idea how they justify only producing a 10 minute late night newscast Sunday nights though (late night weeknight newscasts used to be 10 minutes as well)
    Last edited by TVViewer; 10-30-2014 at 11:39 AM.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    885
    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Sunday nights at 6:00PM
    CBC Vancouver was running the National at 6 pm on Sundays.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    I disagree that they don't have the money to have the existing weekend crew produce both an evening and late night newscast.
    So what is happening with this money you think they have? You generally have to pay people to work longer hours.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=SportsFan;67441]C

    BC Vancouver was running the National at 6 pm on Sundays.
    No, The National was airing Sundays at 10:00PM followed by CBC News at 11:00PM on Sundays. On Saturdays CBC was airing The National at 6:00PM, with local news at 10:00PM.


    [COLOR=#000000][SIZE=2][FONT=arial]So what is happening with this money you think they have? You generally have to pay people to work longer hours.

    As I said, I'm assuming they are not producing both an evening and late night newscast on Sunday due to the negative impact they think it will have serving as a lead-in to their primetime lineup. They are employing people to work weekends and in most cases only getting a 30 minute or 10 minute newscast out of them each day.
    Last edited by TVViewer; 10-30-2014 at 08:26 PM.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    885
    Unless you can show me a schedule from September, I’m inclined to believe what I wrote at the time, rather than what you remember 6 weeks later.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    Unless you can show me a schedule from September, I’m inclined to believe what I wrote at the time, rather than what you remember 6 weeks later.
    I'm not inclined to believe anything that comes from you considering things you have said in the past (and I can prove what you are saying is not true, so now is your chance to come forward) but look at what I said 6 weeks ago. I checked CBC's schedule then and notice how I only mentioned The National aired at 6:00PM on Saturdays instead of Saturdays and Sundays? Had the CBC been idiotic enough to schedule CBC Vancouver News on CHEK directly against The National on CBC on both Saturdays and Sundays I certainly would have pointed that out. That's even worse than what they were actually doing. If your lie were true it would have actually proven my point even more.

    This was my point about how inconsistent CBC's news schedule is. CBC Vancouver News was airing every night at 11:00PM except for Saturdays. On Saturdays it was airing at 10:00PM with The National airing at 6:00PM, airing directly against CBC Vancouver News on CHEK. On Sundays, CBC Vancouver News was still airing at 11:00PM following The National at 10:00PM. The schedule was so confusing that even the CBC Vancouver official press release stated that CBC Vancouver's late night newscast was airing Saturdays at 10:30PM on CBC when it was actually airing Saturdays at 10:00PM.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    CBC announced today which newscasts will be reduced to 30 minutes and which newscasts will be reduced to 1 hour starting in Fall 2015. It's also been confirmed that CBC will be eliminating the 5:00PM and 5:30PM newscasts and the start time for newscasts in all markets will be 6:00PM

    Stations with a 1 hour local/regional newscast from 6:00PM to 7:00PM

    CBC Toronto
    CBC Vancouver
    CBC Winnipeg
    CBC Nova Scotia (anchored from Halifax)
    CBC Ottawa
    CBC St. John's
    CBC PEI (anchored from Charlottetown)
    CBC North (30 minutes English, 30 minutes Inuktitut)


    Stations with a 30 minute local/regional newscast from 6:00PM to 6:30PM

    CBC Calgary
    CBC Edmonton
    CBC New Brunswick (anchored from Fredericton)
    CBC Saskatchewan (anchored from Regina)
    CBC Windsor
    CBC Montreal


    Sorry, but this is yet another example of how CBC deserves their non-existent local news ratings. Someone in Toronto decides the cookie cutter local news schedule for the entire network while totally ignoring the actual performance of newscasts in the local market. As horrible as CBC's local news ratings are, some half hours do better than others, and in some of these markets the 6:00PM half hour is the lowest rated, yet now some CBC stations are being forced to cancel the higher rated 5:00PM and 5:30PM newscasts in favor of keeping the lowest rated 6:00PM newscast.

    They did the same thing when they launched the 90 minute news format. 1 hour 6:00PM to 7:00PM newscasts (which were doing awful) were replaced by 90 minute 5:00PM to 6:30PM newscasts in all markets, which I maintain was only done so they could simulcast Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy while still airing Coronation Street in a high profile 6:30PM time slot. Now they are forcing all local markets to go back to the format that wasn't working before.

    I understand budget cuts, but what they are doing is not going to make the situation any better, by moving the time slots they risk losing the small audience they have.

    What I think the CBC should do is just stop trying to directly compete with the private broadcasters with traditional local newscasts. Not because it's unfair for private broadcasters to have a competitor surviving off taxpayer dollars, but because CBC is a beyond horrible competitor that's just burning taxpayer dollars on poorly scheduled newscasts almost nobody is watching. What I think the CBC should do is use the employees and money they have on local programming that complements the local newscasts on CTV and Global instead of directly competing against them. I think CBC should instead produce local investigative newsmagazines, local pre/post hockey shows, local lifestyle shows, etc.., that don't air directly against the local CTV and Global newscasts but instead air in time slots when CTV and Global air regular programming. CBC doesn't have to worry about simulcasts, they don't need to air this local content at 6:00PM. It doesn't matter how much they spend on investigative reporting if they are just going to burry it in a 6:00PM newscast that will get slaughtered by the local newscasts on CTV and Global (which also feature investigative reporting). If they eliminated traditional newscasts and put all their effort into alternative local programming they could spend even more on investigative reporting for a 7:00PM local investigative newsmagazine, and since it would air AFTER CTV and Global's local newscasts they have a better chance that more people will see it, especially if they took advantage of the strong brands like Marketplace or The Fifth Estate.

    In my opinion that's what a public broadcaster should be doing, providing viewers with valuable programming the private broadcasters are not. It makes sense to provide traditional local newscasts in markets the private broadcasters are not serving, it does not make sense to directly compete against them doing the exact same thing in the exact same time slot, especially when viewers are overwhelming choosing the newscasts produced by the private broadcasters. If CBC were a private broadcaster then I would have no problem with them spending all this money on directly competing with the other stations with a low rated 6:00PM newscast and an absurd local news schedule, but the reality is if they were a private broadcaster they wouldn't have the money to do what the CBC is doing. No private broadcaster would find CBC's local news schedule practical or cost efficient.
    Last edited by TVViewer; 12-12-2014 at 11:26 AM.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    CBC employee union press release:



    Under pressure from federal budget cuts and in the name of a “digital first” strategy, the CBC is planning another round of cuts in local news coverage across Canada next fall. This continues a process by the Harper government of breaking faith with Canadians who have clearly said they support a stronger public broadcaster and more local and regional news coverage. These constant changes to news delivery models, broadcasts, the time they are offered and their length, push viewers to pull away from CBC. The new plan also marks a departure from efforts over the last decades to rebuild CBC’s local presence on television. These changes continue the erosion of our public broadcaster as this government just stands by and watches.

    In addition, now that CBC newsrooms are integrated, cuts to local TV programs will inevitably lead to cuts in news coverage overall, locally and nationally. Smaller cities will be the hardest hit in the CBC plan.
    “Everyone knows that local newsgathering is an essential foundation of a relevant national news organization,” says Carmel Smyth, national president of the Canadian Media Guild. “This plan will hack at the roots, especially in the North, the Prairies, Windsor and New Brunswick. And the uneven approach to the cuts seems unfair and unbecoming of public broadcasting. These are the same places that are often least well served by private media.”

    As CBC’s focus emphasizes more online programming and less TV and radio, there is also a concern that news will be less accessible to Canadians, especially those who don’t have access to robust data streaming plans.

    The Canadian Media Guild has called for a reversal of the federal budget cuts that have taken $115 million out of CBC’s budget over the last three years, and for a moratorium on the cuts until the next federal election.

    “Of course we need a plan to boost digital and mobile content but not at the expense of local newsgathering,” says Marc-Philippe Laurin, CBC Branch President. “The CBC needs an influx of funds to allow for a transition to the digital world without destroying the work that has been done so far. Today’s announcement shows the absurdity of trying to plan for 2020 in the context of harsh and continuing budget cuts. The bleeding of our public broadcaster needs to end before it is too late.”
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,468
    Whenever the Internet becomes an issue in any story, I pay a little bit more attention.

    "Transitioning to the digital world" is often code for: Let's fire a bunch of people and try something new, even if we make things worse. If we fail miserably, we'll blame the Internet.

    TVViewer's plan for a better CBC with more content like Marketplace scares me because if he was calling the shots, I would be tempted to watch even more CBC content. Instead, I prefer watching brief moments of the inferior version of the CBC as it constantly wastes taxpayers' money and annoys the private broadcasters (I still prefer CBC news ... even when it sucks, it makes me laugh).

    However, the job losses that the bad management decisions by the CBC often cause, is certainly no laughing matter, so this is certainly a serious issue that goes beyond the mundane scheduling changes of a Canadian network.

    If it indeed becomes tougher for some Canadians to gain access to the news, perhaps Bell, Rogers, etc., could join forces to offer cheaper Internet plans, so that none of us would need to search for ISPs that offered more affordable unlimited data plans.
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,204
    [QUOTE=PokerFace;67725]

    "Transitioning to the digital world" is often code for: Let's fire a bunch of people and try something new, even if we make things worse. If we fail miserably, we'll blame the Internet.

    It's easy to claim you are focusing more online and mobile when you are making cuts to the news operations because it doesn't cost much to increase the amount of content made available on these platforms.



    However, the job losses that the bad management decisions by the CBC often cause, is certainly no laughing matter, so this is certainly a serious issue that goes beyond the mundane scheduling changes of a Canadian network.
    People always like to blame management whether they deserve the blame or not, but in CBC's case it's just so obvious that management is the problem. There really are some people in high level positions at CBC who think these type of decisions make sense. They think CBC is perfect the way it is and they are the "voice of reason". Instead of trying to spin CBC's problems into success stories they need to face the reality that they are doing a lot of things wrong, the audience numbers are proof of this.

    Even the way they are reducing these newscasts makes no sense. They announced that they were shortening newscasts in June, yet it takes them until December 2014 to announce the new schedule, and then the schedule doesn't come into effect until September 2015. So for 8 months they will be expecting viewers to tune into 5:00PM newscasts they know are about to be cancelled.


    If it indeed becomes tougher for some Canadians to gain access to the news, perhaps Bell, Rogers, etc., could join forces to offer cheaper Internet plans, so that none of us would need to search for ISPs that offered more affordable unlimited data plans.

    Well (and this is something the CBC union obviously wouldn't want to point out) the reality is most people wont need to go online to fill the void left by the reduced CBC newscasts. The CBC union press release ignores that for the vast majority of Canadians CBC reducing news will not make the only local source of television news less accessible to them. It will make CBC News less accessible, but the only markets where CBC is the only source for local television news is the north and PEI. Global (which currently serves PEI with Global New Brunswick) has already announced plans to enter the PEI market with Global Charlottetown for the launch of Global News 1, so it wont be long before the amount of television news available to viewers in PEI will actually increase, just not from the CBC. Also, almost every market CBC serves has an option for CTV and/or Global News at 5:00PM and/or 5:30PM in addition to 6:00PM, so most viewers will even be able to get news at the same time they do now, just not from the CBC.

    That's another problem with the CBC, they are only serving 2 markets not served by any private broadcasters, and they are serving these markets quite poorly compared to how CTV and Global serve markets where they are the only source for local news. If CBC were to shut down their news operations in PEI, i'm almost certain that Shaw would be willing to fill the void with a full fledged Global Charlottetown conventional station that would provide more than just a 5 day a week evening newscast (Global New Brunswick for example offers New Brunswick's only local late night newscast, in addition to a local newscast at 6:00PM, and in the smallest market served by Global News, Lethbridge, they offer half hour newscasts each weekday at 5:00PM, 6:00PM, and 11:00PM) yet a 5 day a week evening newscast is all PEI viewers get from CBC.

    Now, compare this to Bell shutting down CTV. If CTV were to shut down viewers in Kitchener, Barrie, London, and Northern Ontario would lose their only source of local television news, while viewers in every other city CTV operates would lose either the #1 or #2 source of local television news, and Ottawa is probably the only market where Shaw would be willing to fill the void left by CTV with a full fledged Global Ottawa conventional station. CTV serves more markets nobody else is serving, and unlike CBC, they do it with at least evening and late night newscasts 7 days a week.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •