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  1. #1
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    CBC to reduce local 90 minute evening news to 1 hour or 30 minutes




    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/cbc-to...ions-1.2688409

    The CBC is shifting its priorities from television and radio to digital and mobile services, a move that will reduce staff, and supper-hour news broadcasts and programs produced in-house, says CBC president and CEO Hubert T. Lacroix.

    “We used to lead with television and radio. Web came and then mobility came. We are reversing, we are inverting the priorities that we have,” Lacroix said, referring to the broadcaster’s 2020 strategy. “We’re going to lead now with mobility, we’re going to lead with whatever widget you use.

    "You’re going to see an investment in mobility that’s going to rise as the investment in perhaps television ... is reduced.”

    Lacroix said there will be job cuts over the coming years, but they will be made in "prudent steps."

    In 2020, the corporation will have 1,000 to 1,500 fewer employees. This would be in addition to the reductions announced to date.

    Currently, 1,000 employees are eligible for retirement and through attrition, while about 300 leave every year, according to the broadcaster.

    “The goal is that to be able to meet a financially stable and sustainable CBC/Radio-Canada, we have to reduce the infrastructures ... but we also have to reduce the number of people who are working at CBC/Radio-Canada,” Lacroix said.

    In April, Lacroix announced that funding shortfalls and revenue losses had forced the broadcaster to cut $130 million from its budget this year, a move that the CBC said will eliminate 657 jobs over the next two years and take the network out of competing for the rights to broadcast professional sports.

    But Lacroix characterized Thursday’s announcement as “a good day, it’s an important day. This is a plan that’s going to work.”
    No stations to close, Lacroix says

    Lacroix said CBC won’t close any of its stations across the country, but the 90-minute evening television newscasts will be reduced to either 30 minutes or 60 minutes.

    “The base service across Canada is going to be 30 minutes. In some regions, depending on whether they’re successful, the reaction of the audience, where there are revenue opportunities, our mandate, minority language commitments, conditions of licence, we are then going to go in some of these markets to 60 minutes.”

    Those services will be augmented by mobile and web services, he said.

    The CBC's move to “significantly reduce” in-house production across the organization will exclude news current affairs and radio. This will mean fewer documentaries directly produced by the broadcaster.

    “Why are we doing this? Again, to scale it down, to be able to open our content creation to other actors, other participants in the cultural industry,” Lacroix said.
    'We're in the business of content'

    A number of CBC personalities have gone public with their opposition to the cuts.

    Lacroix said this doesn’t mean the CBC is “out of docs [documentaries],” but instead will use the whole of the creative community to fill the slots.

    “To be the public broadcaster, we don’t need to be always the producer,” he said.

    The CBC also plans to cut its real estate presence in half by approximately two million square feet.

    At the Montreal station, for example, there will be a “substantial reduction in square feet.” Toronto will also try to reduce its real estate by acquiring new tenants.

    “If there should be an offer on the building, yes, we’d take it, but the offer on the building would not necessarily mean that we’d move away. We’d become a tenant.

    “We’re not in the business of real estate. We’re in the business of content,” Lacroix added.



    No word on the time slots for these new 30 minute or 1 hour evening newscasts. One positive is that it appears local late night newscasts will remain.

    I don't see 30 minute / 1 hour local evening newscasts as a bad thing, what's bad is that they are doing this to eliminate jobs. There is a difference between producing a 30 minute newscast because it's a strategic scheduling move (which is what CTV and Global do in some markets) and producing a 30 minute newscast because you don't have the resources to produce anything more, and that unfortunately appears to be what's happening at CBC.

    Another unknown is which stations will get an hour or 30 minutes. They say the more successful markets will get a full hour but there aren't any markets where CBC is successful. They will probably have large markets with 1 hour with smaller markets getting the 30 minutes.

    Here's the amount of local evening/late night news by CBC's competitors in each market

    Vancouver
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours and 30 minutes

    Edmonton
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours and 30 minutes

    Calgary
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours and 30 minutes

    Lethbridge
    CTV: 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Regina
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Saskatoon
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Winnipeg
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour and 30 minutes

    Toronto
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours

    Montreal
    CTV: 1 hour and 30 minutes
    Global: 1 hour

    Maritimes
    CTV: 2 hours and 30 minutes
    Global: 2 hours

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post


    I don't see 30 minute / 1 hour local evening newscasts as a bad thing, what's bad is that they are doing this to eliminate jobs. There is a difference between producing a 30 minute newscast because it's a strategic scheduling move (which is what CTV and Global do in some markets) and producing a 30 minute newscast because you don't have the resources to produce anything more, and that unfortunately appears to be what's happening at CBC.



    What do you expect from years of budget cuts, but even in the Internet age we still need an third national broadcaster that can produce local, national and international news that isn't an CP, AP or Returns article.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post


    Another unknown is which stations will get an hour or 30 minutes. They say the more successful markets will get a full hour but there aren't any markets where CBC is successful. They will probably have large markets with 1 hour with smaller markets getting the 30 minutes.
    More than likely Vancouver, Toronto and some maritime provinces will have an hour newscast, while all other markets will shrink. Personally, I think they should mimc CTV's late local and national news; have The National reduced to half-hour and move to 11:00pm and have local late night news moved to 11:30pm
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=Mayhem;66432]


    What do you expect from years of budget cuts, but even in the Internet age we still need an third national broadcaster that can produce local, national and international news that isn't an CP, AP or Returns article.
    CBC is making their own decisions on what to cut though, and I maintain that they are responsible for their non-existent local news ratings due to the way their news is scheduled and their overall commitment. If CBC's local news had higher ratings they would have more revenue and wouldn't need to make as many cuts. Budget cuts aren't the reason CBC's local evening news only has around 10,000 viewers in Vancouver and 3,000 viewers in Calgary.

    What they should do is eliminate French news outside of Quebec. The fact that they are producing French newscasts in cities where only a small tiny non-existent fraction of the population can speak the language is just absurd, especially since it's very unlikely that French is the only language these few people understand in these markets. The vast majority can't speak French and the vast majority of the minority who can is bilingual. Instead of serving a non-existent minority with a cheap under funded newscast they should devote the resources to their English newscasts. There are so many communities across Canada CBC does not serve with local news, yet Vancouver has a French language newscast. If the CBC is going to cherry pick their priorities, this should certainly be one of them.


    More than likely Vancouver, Toronto and some maritime provinces will have an hour newscast, while all other markets will shrink. Personally, I think they should mimc CTV's late local and national news; have The National reduced to half-hour and move to 11:00pm and have local late night news moved to 11:30pm
    I disagree. Yes, 10:00PM means The National airs against hit network programming, but they are not going to gain viewers going up against CTV National News and Global's News Hour Final, and by moving it to 11:00PM they risk losing the audience they have as there is no guarantee that the people who watch The National at 10:00PM will wait to 11:00PM, and the people who are willing to wait may just decide to watch CTV National News or News Hour Final instead. In addition, local news at 11:30PM would put it against both News Hour Final and CTV's local 11:30PM newscast.
    Last edited by TVViewer; 06-27-2014 at 12:27 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    CBC is making their own decisions on what to cut though, and I maintain that they are responsible for their non-existent local news ratings due to the way their news is scheduled and their overall commitment. If CBC's local news had higher ratings they would have more revenue and wouldn't need to make as many cuts. Budget cuts aren't the reason CBC's local evening news only has around 10,000 viewers in Vancouver and 3,000 viewers in Calgary.


    But how do you improve if viewers haven't changed its prefer newscast in over thirty years?

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    What they should do is eliminate French news outside of Quebec. The fact that they are producing French newscasts in cities where only a small tiny non-existent fraction of the population can speak the language is just absurd, especially since it's very unlikely that French is the only language these few people understand in these markets. The vast majority can't speak French and the vast majority of the minority who can is bilingual. Instead of serving a non-existent minority with a cheap under funded newscast they should devote the resources to their English newscasts. There are so many communities across Canada CBC does not serve with local news, yet Vancouver has a French language newscast. If the CBC is going to cherry pick their priorities, this should certainly be one of them.

    Without any doubt the CBC would drop French language newscasts, television and radio stations outside Quebec in an heartbeat if it could, hoverver it's law that they must provide both English and French television and radio services through Canada. What they could and should have done is make Radio-Canada an digital OTA sub-channel outside of Quebec, reducing the costs of maintaining two OTA transmitter down to one.

    As for eliminating French language newscasts altogether outside Quebec, I doubt that will ever happen any time soon, seeing its would be too much of an political hot potato that no politician will bring up.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    I disagree. Yes, 10:00PM means The National airs against hit network programming, but they are not going to gain viewers going up against CTV National News and Global's News Hour Final, and by moving it to 11:00PM they risk losing the audience they have as there is no guarantee that the people who watch The National at 10:00PM will wait to 11:00PM, and the people who are willing to wait may just decide to watch CTV National News or News Hour Final instead. In addition, local news at 11:30PM would put it against both News Hour Final and CTV's local 11:30PM newscast.
    Well, CTV National News is doing something right, It's in the top 30; and Global's News Hour Final I didn't include because its local news orientated while CTV National News and CBC The National coverage is national and international news, I put CBC Late Nigh at 11:30 because they need something anyways to fill the void after George Stroumboulopoulos leaves in the fall.

    I should also point out that CBC The National ratings do not include any PPM viewing data from CBC News Network.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=Mayhem;66490]

    But how do you improve if viewers haven't changed its prefer newscast in over thirty years?
    You be as good as your competitors with the same commitment to news as your competitors, and CBC has not done this at all. CBC made the decision to compete against CTV and Global's news with just a 5 day a week evening news block while CTV and Global were producing several newscasts throughout the day 7 days a week. Expecting to be successful with this strategy was idiotic. Even the person responsible for CBC's local news strategy is now saying it was a mistake and the CBC should have left local news to the private broadcasters.

    The whole idea to compete against them anyway didn't make sense in the first place. As a public broadcaster, they should have focused on the markets the private broadcasters were not serving with local news. Instead they made the decision to compete against the private broadcasters local news while making far less of a commitment than the private broadcasters.


    Without any doubt the CBC would drop French language newscasts, television and radio stations outside Quebec in an heartbeat if it could, hoverver it's law that they must provide both English and French television and radio services through Canada. What they could and should have done is make Radio-Canada an digital OTA sub-channel outside of Quebec, reducing the costs of maintaining two OTA transmitter down to one.

    As for eliminating French language newscasts altogether outside Quebec, I doubt that will ever happen any time soon, seeing its would be too much of an political hot potato that no politician will bring up.

    Not every market they serve has local newscast in both English and French, but some do, and they should be eliminated.



    Well, CTV National News is doing something right, It's in the top 30;
    Which is why I don't think CBC should put The National against it. The 3rd place national newscast is not going to gain viewers moving directly against the #1 national newscast. It's also not realistic that everyone who watches The National at 10:00PM will continue to watch the program at 11:00PM. Some may watch The National because it's on at 10:00PM and 11:00PM is too late, etc.

    and Global's News Hour Final I didn't include because its local news orientated while CTV National News and CBC The National coverage is national and international news,

    It's still a newscast though (and like all of Global's local newscasts, does cover national and international stories) and is going to have more audience overlap vs a primetime drama. The National would go from being the only newscast in its time slot to a newscast going up against two established 11:00PM newscasts.

    I put CBC Late Nigh at 11:30 because they need something anyways to fill the void after George Stroumboulopoulos leaves in the fall.

    I should also point out that CBC The National ratings do not include any PPM viewing data from CBC News Network.
    Which is where a lot of the audience could go if The National moved to 11:00PM on CBC. Also, CBC News Network airs The National at 11:00PM, so that kind of gives them an idea of how it would perform in the slot.
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post


    But how do you improve if viewers haven't changed its prefer newscast in over thirty years?
    How do they expect viewers to find their newscast when they have such an inconsistent schedule?

    CBC Vancouver is replacing their flagship evening anchor Gloria Macarenko (who is moving to CBC Radio) with CBC Montreal's Andrew Chang. (this appears to be a cost cutting decision as there is nothing really strategic about replacing your flagship anchor with someone from another market your viewers are not familiar with, but it does reduce costs by eliminating a co-anchor position at CBC Montreal). In the press release it states where you can catch CBC News Vancouver
    "CBC News Vancouver airs weeknights at 5, 6 and 11 pm, Saturdays at 10:30 pm and Sundays at 11 pm on CBC TV. CBC News Vancouver can also be seen on CHEK TV 7 nights a week at 6 pm."
    Yet the schedule for CBC Vancouver all summer (the press release was issued in July) and at least for September has CBC News Vancouver Saturdays at 10:00PM, NOT 10:30PM, with The National at 6:00PM (directly against CBC News Vancouver on CHEK, which results in them competing against themselves).

    When you can't even figure out the correct time slots for your own newscasts in your own press release (they released the same incorrect time again in August), it's a pretty good indication you are not doing a good job at scheduling news. Maybe it moves to 10:30PM in October when hockey comes in, but that's even worse as it means the late night newscast not only doesn’t air at the same time 7 days a week but doesn't even air at the same time each Saturday year round.

    Instead of demoting and replacing anchors, CBC should come up with a realistic schedule for their newscasts. For starters, if they are going to produce a 6:00PM newscast 7 days a week, it should actually air on CBC 7 days a week. It makes zero sense for them to air local CBC News on CHEK and air The National at the same time on CBC. Also, if they are going to produce a local late night newscast 7 days a week, it should air at the same time 7 days a week. This is a perfect example of what's wrong with the CBC, what they are doing is not working well at all, it wastes money and is a ridiculous way to build an audience and serve viewers but it's done anyway because it's the CBC.

    Oh yeah, last night Alberta got a new premier. While CTV and Global produced special primetime coverage beginning at 7:00PM, CBC Calgary and CBC Edmonton continued with regular CBC network programming. Of course, CBC Calgary and Edmonton don't have any local newscasts on weekends, just a 30 minute regional Alberta newscast which airs Saturdays at 11:30PM and Sundays at 11:00PM (of course they make sure it airs at different times each night)
    My views are my own and do not represent any company.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    CBC Vancouver is replacing their flagship evening anchor Gloria Macarenko (who is moving to CBC Radio) with CBC Montreal's Andrew Chang. (this appears to be a cost cutting decision as there is nothing really strategic about replacing your flagship anchor with someone from another market your viewers are not familiar with, but it does reduce costs by eliminating a co-anchor position at CBC Montreal). ... Instead of demoting and replacing anchors, ...
    It was a strange move for Gloria. She's been there a long time so I can understand that she might want to try something else, but most people would look at it as a major step down. If the CBC did tell her they couldn't afford to renew her contract and she wants to continue in hard news, she'll have other options.

    Quote Originally Posted by TVViewer View Post
    Maybe it moves to 10:30PM in October when hockey comes in, but that's even worse as it means the late night newscast not only doesn’t air at the same time 7 days a week but doesn't even air at the same time each Saturday year round.
    CBC should come up with a realistic schedule for their newscasts. For starters, if they are going to produce a 6:00PM newscast 7 days a week, it should actually air on CBC 7 days a week. It makes zero sense for them to air local CBC News on CHEK and air The National at the same time on CBC. Also, if they are going to produce a local late night newscast 7 days a week, it should air at the same time 7 days a week. This is a perfect example of what's wrong with the CBC, what they are doing is not working well at all, it wastes money and is a ridiculous way to build an audience and serve viewers but it's done anyway because it's the CBC.
    They do have news at 6 at 10 everyday, it's just that The National moves. As for moving the news for live sports, everyone does that.

 

 

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