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  1. #1
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    Netflix vs. the World

    North Americans seem to be getting closer to a time when NOT having a cable or satellite subscription, will be less shocking than NOT having a Netflix subscription.

    I don't think that I'll ever subscribe to Netflix, but I might one day try a short-term cable subscription just to see how things have changed since the last time I was a cable subscriber (about 2 or 3 years ago?). I hate cable, but as a short-term experience, I don't mind putting up with the high prices and lousy equipment (courtesy of Mr. Rogers), so I can quickly satisfy my curiosity and catch up on a few things that might not appear online.

    Netflix invaded Canada in 2010 and as the Netflix campaign for world domination spreads far and wide, other "virgin" territories are preparing for battle by locking up as much content as possible.

    ----------

    http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/netflix-won-war-on-tv/
    [Nov 19, 2015 - Netflix already won the war against TV networks]

    For much of its existence, Netflix has relied on studios and networks for programming. As the company becomes more and more ambitious in its own productions, networks are rightfully afraid the roles will be reversed. The nightmare scenario for networks is for Netflix to become the gatekeeper to viewers, with studios dependent on the service to provide shows to new viewers. Not only would this remove ad revenue from the equation—Reed Hastings has continually said Netflix will never run ads—but it would leave networks with only one customer.

    A report from last week reveals just how much networks are willing to change to fight what the Wall Street Journal calls the “Netflix Problem.” ... Executives at cable companies like Time Warner are also urging networks to load more of their shows to on-demand services provided by the cable company itself, as opposed to syndicating them on Netflix.
    ----------

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...prepare-811628
    [Netflix vs. The World: Foreign Streamers Prepare for War]

    The key foreign markets where Netflix can expect a fight:

    Italy, Spain, Japan and India.
    -----------

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...s-italy-833935
    [Netflix vs. Italy]

    http://variety.com/2015/digital/glob...os-1201621918/
    [Netflix vs. Spain]

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/robcain/...d-over-valued/
    [Netflix vs. Japan]

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/.../#.Vk4lOdKrRnJ
    [More on Netflix vs. Japan]

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/as-netf...ds-in-its-way/
    [Netflix vs. India]

    https://www.quora.com/Does-Netflix-h...vices-in-India
    [More on Netflix vs. India]

    http://variety.com/2015/biz/asia/net...in-1201542321/
    [Bonus War ... Netflix vs. China]
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  2. #2
    Just watched a whole season of "Master of None". What a great sitcom. Very Very Original and FUNNY!

    Good Night Broadcast Television!

  3. #3
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    The Netflix invasion continues, as it's now available in more than 190 countries (wowee!):

    https://media.netflix.com/en/press-r...ound-the-world
    [Netflix around the world]

    https://help.netflix.com/en/node/14164
    [Netflix availablity]
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  4. #4
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    Netflix to crack down on region switching


    Those using proxies and unblockers will only be able to access the service in the country where they currently are


    https://media.netflix.com/en/company...global-service

  5. #5
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    Another brick for the walled garden. But that's okay since Netflix Canada will still be showing the Netflix original content.

    Netflix will soon make use of a giant net to protect its borders from intruders. Donald Trump prefers walls, but if a giant net works for Netflix, Trump might try it out on the Mexicans.

    Netflix - Now Streaming Worldwide:
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  6. #6
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    All this talk of VPNs and paying for content locked to specific foreign companies (Hulu, etc.) is just going to better educate the masses about the various loopholes that are available to consumers of content ... as well as forcing the VPN and DNS providers to improve their methods of combating geo/region blocking.

    If it's soon best to subscribe separately to each Netflix country you are interested in, you can always sign-up to Netflix UK for one month, then cancel and sign-up for Netflix US, etc. ... it's not as convenient or as financially beneficial to your bank account, but if it's the only way you want to legally pay for the content you want, so be it.

    Thank you, Netflix. The more work you do to restrict content from being shared with the world, the dumber the copyright cartel looks.

    Now if we could just get one low price to gain "legal" access to ALL of the USA's regional and major sports networks through a single Netflix subscription, sign me up (I'm currently living in Canada, but I will relocate to Anywhere, USA if necessary).
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    ... "legal" access to ALL of the USA's regional and major sports networks through a single Netflix subscription, sign me up (I'm currently living in Canada, but I will relocate to Anywhere, USA if necessary).
    They're going to have to do something to stop all the pirate streaming of sports events and even sports channels from around the world if they want to encourage us to pay to get them legitimately. They are ridiculously easy to find and watch (even if the quality may not be the best) despite occasional token efforts to appear to be doing something, like shutting down Wiziwig just over a year ago.
    http://www.theguardian.com/football/...otball-streams
    Last edited by Donovan's Monkey; 01-16-2016 at 01:54 PM.

  8. #8
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    There are some cable companies in the US without access to Fox Sports 2, even though they have access to Fox Sports 1. We can't get them in Canada, and the pirate streams of the actual channels often look like mud, with sound that is far from pleasant. The actual games can be found in better quality, but some of the better looking pirated feeds tend to buffer a lot.

    You can often get better sports streams if you use the P2P or Ace streams (or whatever they call them), and of course from the independent streamers using their own 720pish satellite feeds, but for the most part, only the PPV sports feeds tend to get the attention of the authorities.

    Sports piracy, though rampant, doesn't seem to be enticing enough to encourage cord cutting, when compared to the better quality achieved from cable/satellite or OTA broadcasts. Plus, the official online sports feeds are more reliable and thus more desirable to pay for than hoping for the best with many of the less-than-stellar pirate feeds.

    Kodi probably makes it easier to find many better quality sports feeds, but I assume many of them come from the same sites that I use, so I doubt that they can be even 90% reliable on any given day.

    I'm no longer a big enough sports fan to worry that much about a 360p stream vs a better 720p one, but when I see the difference, I can certainly understand why sports fans prefer to remain with cable and satellite services, as well as supplementing with legitimate online services.

    EDIT: Many forums (and some pirate sites) provide higher-quality sports feed links (including some private YouTube streams, etc.), but I tend to only use those forums for events that I really want to watch more closely.
    Last edited by PokerFace; 01-16-2016 at 08:06 PM. Reason: added the EDIT
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  9. #9
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    In order to have a fighting chance in a bidding war with Netflix over content, countries are joining forces. These alliances also allow for more co-productions that won't be sold to Netflix (at least not as first-run opportunities, unless perhaps Netflix wants to pay through the nose for the content).

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/netflixs...ats-1453026602
    [Netflix’s Global Growth Faces New Threats]

    Excerpts from the article:

    When Netflix Inc. won rights to premiere gothic TV drama “Penny Dreadful” in several European countries, local media companies that lost out were miffed.

    They were growing increasingly frustrated that the streaming juggernaut is scooping up exclusive rights to top shows as it pursues an aggressive global expansion, locking them out in their home markets. It was time to mount a response.

    Shortly after the “Penny Dreadful” deal in late 2014, senior executives at French pay-television group Canal Plus and rival operator Sky PLC met to discuss jointly bidding for TV shows, a way to counter Netflix, people familiar with the discussions say.

    “’Penny Dreadful’ was a big battle; we absolutely wanted it,” a person familiar with Canal Plus’s thinking said. “On our own, we couldn’t do it anymore.”

    Similar discussions are taking place among Netflix’s rivals elsewhere. Streaming service Viaplay in the Nordics has been talking with Australian streaming service Stan, Lightbox in New Zealand and Hulu in the U.S. with hopes of forming a bidding alliance in time for May’s annual screenings of new shows for international buyers in Los Angeles, people close to the talks say.

    Europe’s Sky, which effectively is controlled by 21st Century Fox, has held similar conversations with Canada’s Bell Media and Australia’s Foxtel in recent months, other people involved say. Others, including Southeast Asian streaming services iflix and HOOQ, as well as Canada’s Shomi, also are in the mix.

    Executives say discussions are nascent and acknowledge hurdles toward getting multiple companies in different countries to agree on content.

    But taken together, the talks are a burgeoning rebellion against Netflix’s growing global might. The companies hope banding together will allow them to make more appealing offers to TV studios that create and sell shows.

    . . .

    Taking the rich global-rights fees Netflix offers can instantly make a show profitable and please the actors and producers who share in the returns. But there are trade-offs for studios. It is possible they could earn even more by selling a show to regional players. Ideally, studios would prefer to nurture competitors to Netflix.

    They “have become very wary of what the future might look like if they enable much more of a global monopoly,” said Mike Sneesby, chief executive of Australia’s Stan.

    Global consortia haven’t materialized yet, but local players already are trying new ways of countering Netflix at home.

    Media conglomerates such as Sky, Sweden’s Modern Times Group and Australia’s Foxtel increasingly are buying television and streaming on-demand rights to shows in a single bundled deal, effectively cutting out Netflix from their territories. In Sky’s case, the merger in 2014 of its British, Italian and German units has given the company added heft for buying rights.

    Foxtel won local rights to “Fear the Walking Dead” from studio Entertainment One—despite Netflix’s global offer—by linking up with Presto, the streaming service it owns half of, and sister company 21st Century Fox’s FX Network. (21st Century Fox, which also has a one-third stake in Hulu, was part of the same company as Wall Street Journal-owner News Corp until 2013. News Corp. owns 50% of Foxtel.)

    Still, Peter Bithos, chief executive of Southeast Asian streaming service HOOQ said bigger, pan-regional partnerships are necessary to really take on Netflix and predicted they will form within six months. Going forward, “if you can’t put global rights on the table, you’re going to be at a disadvantage,” he said.
    EDIT: To read the full article for free (like I did), you can make a Google Alert for Netflix ... and the link sent (although it's the same link I posted, that needs a subscription) within the Google Alert will send you to the full article (even though it's the same link I posted here).
    Last edited by PokerFace; 01-17-2016 at 02:40 PM. Reason: added the EDIT
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

  10. #10
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    Icon10 Netflix needs to be treated like a terrorist organization according to Kenya

    Wow, this a stretch, even for Africa.

    The KFCB (not related to KFC -- Colonel Sanders is not a terrorist!) thinks that Netflix should be treated in the same way that a terrorist organization should be treated.

    The Kenya Film Classification Board (KFCB) thinks that Netflix should be regulated and wants to meet with Netflix ... this sounds just like our CRTC vs Netflix meetings. Except that the KFCB is also KRAZY enough to try to relate Netflix to any terrorist organization spreading hate/terror through the Internet. Wow, must be something in the water supply that causes that kind of Krazy with a capital K.

    http://qz.com/598521/kenyas-film-reg...onal-security/
    [Kenya’s film regulator is calling Netflix a threat to the country’s national security]

    Netflix’s introduction to East Africa’s largest economy isn’t going so well. The Kenya Film Classification Board (KFCB), the government body that regulates all visual media in the country, called the streaming service a threat to the country’s “moral values and national security” and said it would seek to block the service if inappropriate content was not dealt with.

    At a press conference in Nairobi, the KFCB said Netflix had not sought a license before it began operating in the country two weeks ago and that the regulator would like to speak with the company.

    “The board regards this development as a gross contravention of the laws governing film and broadcast content distribution in Kenya,” KFCB chairman Jackson Kosgei said in a statement emailed to Quartz. He added that Kenya could not afford to be a “passive recipient of foreign content that could corrupt the moral values of our children.”

    The sentiment is part of ongoing confusion and debate over how to define and regulate Netflix, now available throughout Africa. Another regulator, Kenya’s Communications Authority, says that Netflix should not be treated as a traditional broadcaster because it operates more like online platforms such as YouTube or Facebook, which haven’t required special licenses.

    “Netflix is an internet television network, not a traditional broadcaster. Services delivered over the internet present all sorts of novel questions for policymakers,”Joris Evers, a spokesman for Netflix told Quartz. “We empower consumers to make smart viewing choices by providing details on the titles on Netflix, including ratings and episode synopses. We also provide parental controls.”

    Curiously, the KFCB—whose mission is to safe guard “national values and norms”—also linked the debate over Netflix to the country’s ongoing fight against al-Shabaab militants. The Somali-based Islamists recently attacked a Kenyan military base, killing as many as 100 soldiers, by the group’s own count. The KFCB said in its statement:

    “The board holds the view that in this era of global terrorism, including broadcasts over the internet by terrorist entities, vigilance is the price of safety and prevention. As Kenyans, we therefore need to ask all the right questions about the unregulated arrival and future of Netflix in the country. We need to ponder its implications in light of the ongoing war on terror by questioning the manner and nature of Netflix’s introduction of services in Kenya.”

    Earlier this month, the Communications Authority barred radio stations from broadcasting shows that mention sex during peak listening hours. Daytime radio shows featuring candid and often graphic discussions about sex are common in Nairobi, where much of the listening audience is composed of city commuters stuck in traffic. The regulator also banned preachers from asking for money on radio shows. Critics say these new attempts to regulate the media have more to do with controlling public forums for free expression than protecting children.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    Wow, this a stretch, even for Africa.
    Just reading a wikipedia article about Kenya. Only 36.3% of the population can afford a computer at home with internet access (51 IISPs available). Everyone else go to internet cafés. You need a dongle (electronic key), for a monthly price, to access the internet, plus a fee for the data, on top of the modem fee.

    Connecting the dots, imagine someone going to the internet café with his family, or at home, login to Netflix and watch OITNB with the lesbian scenes. OMG! Those kids will be scarred for life, corrupted by western culture ! And you're not supposed to talk or mention sex before midnight, which is a standard set by the KFCB.

    Understandable, but at some point, the state trying to control everything gets ridiculous.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    The Kenya Film Classification Board (KFCB) thinks that Netflix should be regulated and wants to meet with Netflix ... this sounds just like our CRTC vs Netflix meetings. Except that the KFCB is also KRAZY enough to try to relate Netflix to any terrorist organization spreading hate/terror through the Internet. Wow, must be something in the water supply that causes that kind of Krazy with a capital K.
    Like any politician, the goal is to get people to associate it with something bad so people can't get the idea out of their head the two are related. But without going too political, they are likely banning it because of its LGBT library that Netflix offers is something that a largely christian nation frowns upon.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  13. #13
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    HBO vs Netflix ... As the two warriors battle each other for global attention, Chelsea Handler popped up on Netflix with her 4 episode docu-series, while Whitney Cummings (often appeared on E's Chelsea Lately) appeared on HBO (Saturday night), with her first HBO stand-up special.

    I'm watching Chelsea Handler's Netflix series now, and I watched Whitney's HBO special yesterday. I don't have either service, but for the moment, in this golden age of piracy, the FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) forces me to keep up with pop culture.

    Although Whitney didn't appear to be holding back in any way during her HBO special, there was one word that HBO asked her not to say ... that word was Netflix.

    So it appears that Netflix is the 'N' word that HBO despises the most. I'm curious to see if any future stand-up routines on HBO will contain the word Netflix.

    Whitney mentioned the HBO request for a "Netflix" word ban while being interviewed by Larry King (for Larry King Now -- on Ora.tv with no commercials for Canadians, but the Americans get the commercials since it switches to a Hulu-based stream if you stream from the US, or your VPN makes it look like you are). When Whitney mentioned that there is no censorship on HBO ... except for the Netflix word block, Larry then laughed and smiled as he said, "Netflix is controlling the world" followed by a Whitney laugh and smile as she replies, "Yeah."

    http://www.ora.tv/larrykingnow/2016/...0_4m6a4nmt0wsh
    [Whitney Cummings on Larry King Now][I used Firefox browser to stream it]

    http://thecelebritycafe.com/2016/01/...friend-review/
    [Whitney's HBO stand-up review ... 2.5/5 ]

    Whitney Cummings: I'm Your Girlfriend - Interview Featurette:

    Last edited by PokerFace; 01-25-2016 at 07:09 AM. Reason: added another sentence about the Larry King interview and the ora.tv interview link
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  14. #14
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    Now we travel to Indonesia, where Indonesia's largest telecommunications service provider, Telkom, blocked its subscribers from accessing Netflix for its questionable content and other nonsense that is obviously linked to its fear of the mighty Netflix growing too powerful and perhaps interfering with the bottom line ... greed.

    I'm losing interest in this Netflix porn and violence excuse as a means to block it from various countries, but here are the article links if you want to read more on the subject:

    http://thediplomat.com/2016/01/netflix-vs-indonesia/
    [Netflix vs Indonesia]

    http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2...s-netflix.html
    [Telkom blocks Netflix]

    http://deadline.com/2016/01/netflix-...ck-1201691393/
    [Indonesia block of Netflix by largest telco]

    http://www.cinemablend.com/televisio...rn-114487.html
    [A Major Country Is Blocking Netflix Thanks To Too Much Porn]
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    HBO vs Netflix ... As the two warriors battle each other for global attention, Chelsea Handler popped up on Netflix with her 4 episode docu-series, while Whitney Cummings (often appeared on E's Chelsea Lately) appeared on HBO (Saturday night), with her first HBO stand-up special.

    I'm watching Chelsea Handler's Netflix series now, and I watched Whitney's HBO special yesterday. I don't have either service, but for the moment, in this golden age of piracy, the FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) forces me to keep up with pop culture.

    Although Whitney didn't appear to be holding back in any way during her HBO special, there was one word that HBO asked her not to say ... that word was Netflix.

    So it appears that Netflix is the 'N' word that HBO despises the most. I'm curious to see if any future stand-up routines on HBO will contain the word Netflix.

    Whitney mentioned the HBO request for a "Netflix" word ban while being interviewed by Larry King (for Larry King Now -- on Ora.tv with no commercials for Canadians, but the Americans get the commercials since it switches to a Hulu-based stream if you stream from the US, or your VPN makes it look like you are). When Whitney mentioned that there is no censorship on HBO ... except for the Netflix word block, Larry then laughed and smiled as he said, "Netflix is controlling the world" followed by a Whitney laugh and smile as she replies, "Yeah."

    HBO and Netflix are more equal competitors than Netflix vs CTV/Global/City/CBC/CBS/NBC/ABC/FOX so on and so forth. So I'm not surprised by this, its a natural fear that HBO is becoming irrelevant as MTV has become irrelevant with music videos. There many excuses I've seen why Netflix is bad for producers is so laughable that you can see that their throwing anything at the wall and hoping it will stick with people.

    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    Now we travel to Indonesia, where Indonesia's largest telecommunications service provider, Telkom, blocked its subscribers from accessing Netflix for its questionable content and other nonsense that is obviously linked to its fear of the mighty Netflix growing too powerful and perhaps interfering with the bottom line ... greed.

    I'm losing interest in this Netflix porn and violence excuse as a means to block it from various countries, but here are the article links if you want to read more on the subject



    You can create and justify any law, as long as you can prove its to protect the children1.


    1This only applies to children theoretical mental health. Issues like hunger, abuse or any other issues that require public funding does not apply. This offer is non-transferable.
    "And Now for Something Completely Different..." - John Cleese (Monty Python).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayhem View Post
    There many excuses I've seen why Netflix is bad for producers is so laughable that you can see that their throwing anything at the wall and hoping it will stick with people.
    Producers aren't thinking outside the box.

    When producing a show for a broadcast network, episode lenght is 42 minutes and ordered 13 or 22 episodes, showrunners are instructed to take a direction because the content and ratings affects the type of advertisers and how much they'll pay, and segments must be delimited for commercial breaks. The network will decide on the tone of the promotion (sexy promo for a show about morals), and may air episodes in a different order than the production that affects continuity (Firefly). This results in episodes will filling-up, boring or repeated "flash-back" content, or episodes with botchered wrapping-up, storylines removed or stretched to a ridiculous amount. There are limits of the amount of violence, nudity and language. In your living room, you just know that an main character in serious life-or-death trouble in a january episode will make it because the actor signed a contract which expires at season finale. Low ratings? Friday night death slot, saturday-night burn-off or cancellation+shelf.

    When producing for HBO or Netflix, episodes are likely ordered at 12-13 per season, but can be of different lenghts, and can be of cruel violence (GoT decapitaion!), nudity (GoT!) and language (wtf?), all episodes make it on the air and in production order, production is paid from subscription revenues, no commercial breaks, storyline can go where the showrunners want it to go, audiences and reviews will decide its fate.

    Just like taxi drivers versus Uber, there will be the old-fashion producers opting for eyeballs on a weelky basis on broadcast television (accessible OTA and basic cable), while others will opt for more freedom but restricted eyeballs.
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  17. #17
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    ^ But the CBC wants you to believe that it is willing to think outside the box by airing content that is closer to what the premium cable channels and SVOD's (Subscription Video on Demand) like Netflix offer.

    Tara Ellis helps guide the CBC as she leads CBC's Content team in original scripted Drama, comedy, kids and digital programming. She was at Showcase and now she's back at the CBC. Look out world, here comes the CBC. Time will tell if this ship can avoid all the icebergs along the way that could possibly sink it.

    http://variety.com/2015/tv/news/cbs-...is-1201613720/
    [Tara Ellis to the rescue?]

    https://cartt.ca/article/smarter-fun...ng-under-ellis
    [-Subscription - ... A smarter, funnier, edgier CBC TV growing under Ellis]

    ... But the pubcaster's [a publicly owned broadcasting station or network] biggest audiences are coming from comedies like Schitt's Creek and Mr. D. So the CBC, with a dominant Netflix Canada in mind, is making good on its promise to push into more edgy, character-driven programming that can compete on the same turf as premium cable and SVODs.

    The trick CBC seems to be getting better at is airing more buzz-worthy shows that grab bigger TV audiences, stream more online and travel well internationally for indie producers looking for an upside.

    "It feels to me like the CBC is lining up with the very appealing television that you're seeing on over-the-top, Netflix series, and premium cable series," said John Murray, vice president and supervising producer at Insight Productions, which has a half-hour drama adaptation of Lisa Gabriele's novel Tempting Faith DiNapoli parked at the CBC.

    ...

    Filmmakers are embracing a CBC that, despite deep budget cuts (although the new federal government has promised a $150 million boost), is doing more serialized series with deeply flawed characters and the intricate plots that have set cable networks like AMC and FX and streamers like Netflix and Amazon apart from competitors.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PokerFace View Post
    ^ But the CBC wants you to believe that it is willing to think outside the box by airing content that is closer to what the premium cable channels and SVOD's (Subscription Video on Demand) like Netflix offer.

    Tara Ellis helps guide the CBC as she leads CBC's Content team in original scripted Drama, comedy, kids and digital programming. She was at Showcase and now she's back at the CBC.
    Recent Numéris Top 30 lists CBC's Schitt's Creek, Heartland and Murdoch Mysteries (the rerun show of excellence over Rogers' channels, annoyingly). Lost Girl and Continuum were good shows, with sci-fi and a few naughty bits. The french-langauge CBC produces mostly "telenovela"-style shows as well as more edgy series (Unité 9, 19-2), that the CBC refused to re-do these shows... 19-2 ended up on Bravo. Canadians (or ROC) are more lilely to complain about a boob on the CBC screen than Quebecers, I doubt any show the CBC orders will top a Netflix-quality show, or cable network for that matter...
    "It's not a rerun if you haven't watched it yet." (© 2010 by TVViewer)
    "Ne jamais s'obstiner avec un épais. Il va vous abaisser à son niveau et vous battre avec l'expérience."

  19. #19
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    ^ The Romeo Section (CBC) had some nudity, but I soon lost interest in the plot and lack of more nudity, so I just had the show on in the background (on other TV) while I surfed the net. I don't know what other countries bought the rights to it (if any), but the reviews were decent enough to perhaps warrant another season.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/...ticle26788502/
    [The Romeo Section review by John Doyle]

    Best of all, The Romeo Section isn’t simplistic. It doesn’t ride roughshod over the intelligent viewer’s skepticism about the spies and spying. It makes the mundanity of spying compelling with flashes of dry humour, and when there needs to be an impact moment of drama, that drama arrives sideways, not telegraphed and then dropped on us.
    ---------

    http://hnmag.ca/exclusive/exclusive-...livers-part-i/
    [More on The Romeo Section]

    Darren: This show has a different flavor in its content. Was that a difficult proposition for CBC?

    Chris Haddock [Creator and co-writer]: Not at all. I wanted to create a show that felt authentic and fresh. I had approached CBC with the idea of a cable style show that allowed nudity and colorful language. We had discussions about what was allowable without censorship.*

    Darren: Will it be seen on other networks?

    Chris Haddock: Presently we have an international distributor, Red Arrow International, and we will be approaching the U.S. for interest.

    Darren: Do you have a team of writers on the show?

    Chris Haddock: We do. I’ve been co-writing with them. I drafted five episodes before production began.

    * If you have kids, you may want to tuck them into bed before watching. It has the components of sex, drugs and homicide — Darren
    Last edited by PokerFace; 02-04-2016 at 10:32 AM. Reason: added extra article link and quotes from it
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  20. #20
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    Over the next two months, the speculation is that Netflix will continue to attach its Geo-checker "virus" to individual accounts, rendering many (if not all, eventually) boxes (XBox, etc.) useless for foreign viewing of Netflix. Estimated by one VPN/DNS company to be at about 30% penetration this week, this Geo "virus" will be more easily overcome via browser use, but since many Netflix subscribers prefer to watch Netflix via their various devices, Netflix should soon start to see a greater abandonment of its service, once subscribers use up the current content that their regional Netflix has available.

    Hulu is also apparently getting tougher to crack, now that more of the world is joining the piracy club.

    So, even if you currently are watching Netflix from all over the world, it's most likely only a matter of time before your Netflix account becomes infected with the Netflix Geo virus.

    And of course, if necessary, a complete blockade against VPNs/DNS connections while trying to watch Netflix could also become more commonplace.

    Even if you think you have the Netflix US library of content at your fingertips, once you try to access content that isn't part of your region's catalogue, that's when you'll realize your account has been tampered with by Netflix.

    So, now that Netflix is working harder to block unauthorized viewers, it will cost more for the various VPNs/DNS services to counter all of Netflix's attempts to block the "pirates."

    Frustrated subscribers of both Netflix and various VPNs are certainly going to eventually become impatient while waiting for the latest fix for their browsers or various devices (assuming that they haven't been infected with the Netflix Geo virus).

    Canada went through something similar with the arrival of the pizza-sized satellite dishes, and then once they spread like wildfire, the move to seize them at the border and drive the distributors of the hacked boxes underground, began.

    CraveTV and Shomi will still need to improve their service if they expect Canadians to surrender even their Canada-only Netflix service.

    World War 3 has begun. There will be a lot of collateral damage until the pirates regroup and use the Force to overcome the darker side of Geo-blocker intelligence. The Netflix Natzis first attacked Europe and now are strategically moving across the Globe to do what they are expected to do, as dictated by the old-school Copyright Cartel.

    At some point, Netflix will have enough of its own original content to influence even more Cable/Satellite subscribers to cut the cord and not worry about the content that is region-blocked (if there's any region-blocked content still available on Netflix in 10 years).
    Last edited by PokerFace; 03-25-2016 at 09:09 PM. Reason: typo
    Warning: I'm not playing with a full deck.

 

 

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